Walk-the-Line

Walk-the-Line

Walk the Line DVD

Walk the Line DVD

A touching and true story, this historical biography recounting the life of Johnny Cash is a must see. Both Joaquin Phoenix and Reese Witherspoon play the parts of Johnny Cash and June Carter Cash incredibly. Country legend, Johnny Cash is remembered vividly in this film.

  • Walk The Line Dress on Ownza

    Related Products: More from Ownza
    Added 2 Years Ago from Ownza
  • Walk the line in fun nautical stripes. Striped bikini pant boasts tunnel side ties for an adjustable fit. Sits low on the hips. Cheeky rear cut. Lined. 90% nylon, 10% spandex. Lining: 100% polyester. Hand wash cold, lay flat to dr... Walk the line in fun nautical stripes. Striped bikini pant boasts tunnel side ties for an adjustable fit. Sits low on the hips. Cheeky rear cut. Lined. 90% nylon, 10% spandex. Lining: 100% polyester. Hand wash cold, lay flat to dry. Made in the U.S.A. View This Model's Measurements If you're not fully satisfied with your purchase, you are welcome to return any unworn and unwashed items with tags intact and original packaging included.

    Related Products: More from Zappos
    Added 4 Years Ago from Zappos
  • Designed by the duo of michael bruun and steffan schmelling of EGO, this is one of their newer items. They have been recipients of the prestigious Red Dot Design award for their products. EGO Water fountain Smooth silence… ... Designed by the duo of michael bruun and steffan schmelling of EGO, this is one of their newer items. They have been recipients of the prestigious Red Dot Design award for their products. EGO Water fountain Smooth silence… for your health and soul… Styled in bone china porcelain. Water softly runs from the top – 230V – 12V Diameter 135 mm x height 325 mm Turning kitsch into reel design EGO walk the line by introducing a sculptured water fountain! A cactus, made of the finest china (a cactus always hold water!) Pumping the water continued to the top, not only creates the most wonderful relaxed sound, it purifies air and human soul! From the old Japanese cultures it has been said that the relaxed sound make the contrast to a hectic urban way of living, now EGO challenges this, in a very modern expression… Eye-catching sculpture placed inside your home, on the table, shelve or floor. Creates a pleasant humidity in the summer office. CE approved – easy to install with the ‘starter-kid’ Transparent electrical cord and black adapter included.

  • Three long years after the Deftones issued their self-titled album to puzzling reviews, the Sacramento quintet is back with Saturday Night Wrist, a recording that will further muddy the waters about who they are and what they're t... Three long years after the Deftones issued their self-titled album to puzzling reviews, the Sacramento quintet is back with Saturday Night Wrist, a recording that will further muddy the waters about who they are and what they're trying to do. After the breakthrough metallic-sounding Around the Fur, the band confounded critics and fans alike with the much softer and atmospherically adventurous White Pony. In 2003 they further transgressed the borderlines of all things boxed and tied with their self-titled album, which seemed to walk the line between rockist and "sensitive." But it's Saturday Night Wrist that fills out the portrait, bleeding though textures from one rock & roll type to another and coming up with something else altogether yet definitively "Deftones." The album began with a question and a small conflict in deciding on a producer. Already working with the hip Dan the Automator, after some internal drama the band decided on veteran Bob Ezrin. Ezrin pays off in a number of ways: these songs, as diverse as they are, are utterly disciplined sonically. They have all the tension and dynamic, all the immediacy of yore, but the mix is spacious, and Chino Moreno's vocals soar above it. That said, the vocals were produced by Far's Shaun Lopez. The wall of guitar sound walks a high wire between harder, more metallic rock and angular indie rock, winding them together. Check the opener -- and single -- "Hole in the Earth." It begins with a wall of feedback and thunderously distorted guitars accented by rim shots and cymbal fire before giving way to a skeletal six-string figure that seems barely able to support Moreno's singing, which combines the euphoria of a young, less pretentious Bono with the attack of, well, the Deftones. Guitars echo and whisper all along the backdrop while Moreno hovers there, until they crackle and spit to bring him back. Popping muddy drums and distorted guitars introduce "Rapture," as Moreno gobs and screams the lyrics. Even here, the attack is straightforward as it turns and twists, all on sharp corners and rhythmic shifts. There are killer digital dub effects put into play on "Cherry Waves," giving the tune a bit of a blessed-out psychedelic effect as the band marries together the hookery of the vintage Smashing Pumpkins, the big chord riffs of Jane's Addiction, and U2's best shimmer while tossing in a bridge of eight bars from the Who's "Overture" from Tommy! It might have been a terrible mess, but it works beautifully. System of a Down's Serj Tankian helps out with additional vocals on "Mein," and Giant Drag's Annie Hardy helps out on "Pink Cellphone" (what a dumb title). The drippy space pop that is "Xerces" finds Moreno breathing a little too close to Billy Corgan for comfort on the verses. The gear-grinding guitars on "Rats!Rats!Rats!" are a welcome textural change, and the crunchy verse and refrain are downright nasty. The most straight-ahead rock attack comes on "KimDracula," with its bass throb and whiteout guitar riff; it pushes Moreno a little further outside the tune to come to terms with it. Ultimately, Saturday Night Wrist is satisfying, though it may take a few listens given all the changes in individual cuts that tend to blur together the first time or two through. To the faithful, the Deftones once again offer up their own brand of blast and croon. As for everyone else, there's plenty here to like, to argue with, and to be puzzled by . ~ Thom Jurek, All Music Guide « less… more »

    Related Products: More from Google
    Added 5 Years Ago from Google
  • Love this graphic poster for Walk the Line, the movie about Johnny Cash. All the Shepard Fairey elements are there, the starburst, the stark silhouette, the old fashioned font. Fairey adds flames and two warm colors, red and orang... Love this graphic poster for Walk the Line, the movie about Johnny Cash. All the Shepard Fairey elements are there, the starburst, the stark silhouette, the old fashioned font. Fairey adds flames and two warm colors, red and orange, to add to the visual impact of this stunning poster.

    Related Products: More from Art
    Added 6 Years Ago from Art
  • This 20-track collection contains several of Johnny Cash's biggest hits on Sun Records recorded in the '50s, including "I Walk the Line," "Folsom Prison Blues," "Hey Porter," "Cry Cry Cry," and "Get Rhythm." Also featured are thre... This 20-track collection contains several of Johnny Cash's biggest hits on Sun Records recorded in the '50s, including "I Walk the Line," "Folsom Prison Blues," "Hey Porter," "Cry Cry Cry," and "Get Rhythm." Also featured are three previously unreleased (in North America) alternate versions of "Folsom Prison Blues," "Ballad of a Teenage Queen," and "The Ways of a Woman in Love." This may not be the best place for the casual fan to start, as it misses many of Cash's classic tunes from a career that spanned five decades. However, this set makes a decent companion to The Man in Black: Greatest Hits on Columbia/Legacy. ~ Al Campbell, All Music Guide

    Related Products: More from Google
    Added 6 Years Ago from Google
  • Someone please alert the Better Business Bureau: in a clear case of false advertising, Mercury Records is marketing a Johnny Cash CD called The Definitive Collection which is anything but definitive. In 1986, Cash found himself wi... Someone please alert the Better Business Bureau: in a clear case of false advertising, Mercury Records is marketing a Johnny Cash CD called The Definitive Collection which is anything but definitive. In 1986, Cash found himself without a record label when Columbia Records decided not to pick up the option on his contract after close to 30 years. Within a year the Man in Black had a new deal with Mercury Records, but like many veteran country acts in the '80s, radio wasn't especially interested in him and Cash's recordings of the period are a frustrating mix of re-recordings of his old hits, and new material pockmarked by overly slick production and engineering that didn't flatter Cash's voice or musical approach. The spirit was still willing within Cash, but he wasn't getting much help, and this collection of material from his brief sojourn with Mercury is often dispiriting stuff. Six of the tunes here were drawn from 1987's Classic Cash, in which Johnny recut 20 of his best-known tunes in honor of his entry into the Country Music Hall of Fame; the new versions of numbers like "I Walk the Line," "Guess Things Happen That Way," "Ring of Fire," and "Cry Cry Cry" are approached in a lean, straightforward fashion, and while Cash handles them like a pro, he doesn't sound especially excited, and the new recordings don't hold a candle to the originals. (Cash also redid some older numbers on his other Mercury sessions, several of which are also included here.) Elsewhere, the selections from Cash's other Mercury albums -- Johnny Cash Is Coming to Town, Boom Chicka Boom, Water from the Wells of Home, and The Mystery of Life -- tend to reflect their flaws instead of their strengths, though there are a few bright moments, including the nostalgic but rollicking "The Night Hank Williams Came to Town" and the apocalyptic "Goin' by the Book." The fact that the disc is bookended by two songs that didn't even appear on Cash's Mercury recordings is telling -- the set leads off with "Highwayman," a single from his collaboration with Waylon Jennings, Kris Kristofferson, and Willie Nelson, and ends with U2's "The Wanderer," with Cash's guest lead vocal giving the song a gravity it sorely needs. As an overview of Cash's years with Mercury, this disc is serviceable but little more. The Definitive Collection? Not by a long shot. ~ Mark Deming, All Music Guide « less… more »

    Related Products: More from Google
    Added 6 Years Ago from Google
  • Each of the three CDs in this box set are comprised of 16 songs devoted to a single theme: love, God, and murder, of course. And each of the three CDs is available separately should you not have a yen for one or two of the discs. ... Each of the three CDs in this box set are comprised of 16 songs devoted to a single theme: love, God, and murder, of course. And each of the three CDs is available separately should you not have a yen for one or two of the discs. Certainly there is a lot of notable music on this box, as it was personally chosen by Cash himself from recordings spanning the mid-'50s to the mid-'90s, mostly heavily weighting the 1955-70 period. There are a few well-known classics here that virtually anyone considering buying this will already know (and probably have), like "I Walk the Line," "I Still Miss Someone," "Ring of Fire," "Folsom Prison Blues," and "The Long Black Veil." The emphasis, however, is on LP tracks, B-sides, and live recordings that probably won't be familiar to the moderate Cash fan; there are also three mid-'60s tracks previously unreleased in the U.S., though none of them are particularly outstanding. Some of those obscure songs are excellent ("Oh, What a Dream," the brutal hangman humor of "Joe Bean," "Mister Garfield") and almost all of them are worth hearing. And each of the CDs is decorated by liner notes from Cash and a celebrity (his wife June Carter for Love, Bono of U2 for God, and director Quentin Tarantino for Murder). The question still nags: who exactly will find this box wholly satisfying? Not the average Cash fan, who wants a smaller greatest-hits set with more familiar tunes. Not the rabid Cash fan, who probably already has much of this, and might want more well-balanced and thorough boxes, such as those issued on Bear Family of Cash's early material. It's for the in-betweeners, who certainly find the more conventional box retrospective The Essential Johnny Cash 1955-1983 the essential first stop. ~ Richie Unterberger, All Music Guide « less… more »

    Related Products: More from Google
    Added 6 Years Ago from Google
  • Johnny Cash's classic recordings for Sun have been reissued many times, and they have been issued in complete form before, most notably in Bear Family's exhaustive five-disc 1990 box set, The Man in Black: 1954-1958. Because of th... Johnny Cash's classic recordings for Sun have been reissued many times, and they have been issued in complete form before, most notably in Bear Family's exhaustive five-disc 1990 box set, The Man in Black: 1954-1958. Because of this glut of product, it's easy to look at Time-Life's 2005 three-disc set, The Complete Sun Recordings 1955-1958, and wonder if it's necessary, or just a quick cash-in tied into the release of the Joaquin Phoenix-starring 2005 biopic Walk the Line. After all, if you're nitpicking, this doesn't even contain the complete Sun recordings -- meaning that this doesn't contain all the alternate takes and false starts that are on the Bear Family box. But if you're looking for alternate takes -- or for that matter, the fly-on-the-wall fifth disc documenting a full recording session from The Man in Black -- you already have the Bear Family set in your library anyway and you wouldn't be interested in another complete Sun set unless it unearths forgotten recordings, which this does not. Instead, Time-Life's box does something useful: it presents one version of each of song Cash recorded at Sun in one convenient package. There are a handful of tracks that include false starts and, at times, undubbed masters are used, but if the hit version is better-known with overdubs -- as on "Guess Things Happen That Way" -- they wisely choose to use that instead. Consequently, this winds up as a useful, succinct summary of Cash's Sun recordings -- a package for the dedicated listener who doesn't need the alternate takes or the actual albums, but wants it all anyway. For that audience, this is an excellent choice. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine, All Music Guide « less… more »

    Related Products: More from Google
    Added 6 Years Ago from Google
  • In my book this is one of the best movies in the last 8 years. Phoenex and Witherspoon are naturals and completely raw at their characters. Not to mention, they did the vocals on their own.

  • I would be remiss if I failed to recommend the complete collection: both volume 1 AND volume 2 of these original Johnny Cash songs. And this volume has a second version of "I Walk the Line". So, these volumes are inseparable, ki... I would be remiss if I failed to recommend the complete collection: both volume 1 AND volume 2 of these original Johnny Cash songs. And this volume has a second version of "I Walk the Line". So, these volumes are inseparable, kind of like Johnny and June Carter.

  • I grew up listening to Johnny Cash on my parent's eight-track cassette tape player. We only had about a half dozen tapes, so it doesn't seem to mean much when I say that Johnny was our favorite. But he was. And when I watched t... I grew up listening to Johnny Cash on my parent's eight-track cassette tape player. We only had about a half dozen tapes, so it doesn't seem to mean much when I say that Johnny was our favorite. But he was. And when I watched the story of his life being so respectfully and soulfully played by Joaquin Phoenix, I cried for his pain and yearned for an end to his suffering. Now I realize, however, that his suffering (and his willingness to identify with the suffering of others) is what made him such an amazing songwriter . . . and a truly great man.

    Related Products: More from Edgesuite
    Added 7 Years Ago from Edgesuite
  • I love Johnny Cash when it was NOT cool. Loved "Boy Named Sue", "Walk the Line" and all the old and goodies.

    Related Products: More from Johnnycashmusic
    Added 7 Years Ago from Johnnycashmusic
  • If you have to wear a tie, you might as well pick one that makes you look like a bad ass. These Psycho Bunny ties from Neiman Marcus walk the line between edgy and juvenile, and get it just right. Now THAT'S a power tie.