Blade Runner : The Final Cut

Blade Runner : The Final Cut

Such a classic from the 80's...can't really say anymore than that...well I can. It was revolutionary and was a tremendous story. Harrison Ford was obviously amazing.

  • Got this from my parents last week and it's amazing. I've already seen the whole show so far, but the subtleties and great acting and costumes and tone will make me go back for more.

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  • A riveting look at the complex relationship even the most jaded industry insider has with brand allegiance. Editorial review: Brands are dead. Advertising no longer works. Weaned on TiVo, the Internet, and other emerging te... A riveting look at the complex relationship even the most jaded industry insider has with brand allegiance. Editorial review: Brands are dead. Advertising no longer works. Weaned on TiVo, the Internet, and other emerging technologies, the short-attention-span generation has become immune to marketing. Consumers are “in control.” Or so we’re told. In Buying In, New York Times Magazine “Consumed” columnist Rob Walker argues that this accepted wisdom misses a much more important and lasting cultural shift. As technology has created avenues for advertising anywhere and everywhere, people are embracing brands more than ever before–creating brands of their own and participating in marketing campaigns for their favorite brands in unprecedented ways. Increasingly, motivated consumers are pitching in to spread the gospel virally, whether by creating Internet video ads for Converse All Stars or becoming word-of-mouth “agents” touting products to friends and family on behalf of huge corporations. In the process, they–we–have begun to funnel cultural, political, and community activities through connections with brands. Walker explores this changing cultural landscape–including a practice he calls “murketing,” blending the terms murky and marketing–by introducing us to the creative marketers, entrepreneurs, artists, and community organizers who have found a way to thrive within it. Using profiles of brands old and new, including Timberland, American Apparel, Pabst Blue Ribbon, Red Bull, iPod, and Livestrong, Walker demonstrates the ways in which buyers adopt products, not just as consumer choices, but as conscious expressions of their identities. Part marketing primer, part work of cultural anthropology, Buying In reveals why now, more than ever, we are what we buy–and vice versa.

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  • Very cool, multi-award winning Guinness commercial. Sounds silly but just in case- make sure you actually click on the guy drinking to start the video. Check out the rest of their video and print ads too. Striking stuff.

  • It's not that retro commercials are necessarily funny- at least not intentionally.... it's that if you're a child of the 80's like myself, these elicit a reaction of "Oh my GOD, I "like" totally remember that!!!!!" Right now I'... It's not that retro commercials are necessarily funny- at least not intentionally.... it's that if you're a child of the 80's like myself, these elicit a reaction of "Oh my GOD, I "like" totally remember that!!!!!" Right now I'm totally remembering my own class trip to Paris in high school. We'll end this now before I get into a review of MY waiter.... I'm already blushing.

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  • If you want a "not so fresh" trip down advertising's memory lane......... Hey- my mom never took ME out on a boat for this conversation~! Maybe it says something about my standards- well, I guess it definitely says something... If you want a "not so fresh" trip down advertising's memory lane......... Hey- my mom never took ME out on a boat for this conversation~! Maybe it says something about my standards- well, I guess it definitely says something about my standards- but this makes me laugh out loud.

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  • "Because sometimes, simply getting your car back just isn't enough." From defending your car to protecting your daughter's chastity to delivering babies, the trunk monkey is a nice feature for any car to have. Episodes 1-6 __... "Because sometimes, simply getting your car back just isn't enough." From defending your car to protecting your daughter's chastity to delivering babies, the trunk monkey is a nice feature for any car to have. Episodes 1-6 ___________________________________________ From Wikipedia: Trunk Monkey is a concept originally created in January, 2000 by Sean Sosik-Hamor, for the automotive group of Subaru enthusiasts in the New England Subaru Impreza Club, or NESIC. The original concept of a "Trunk Monkey" was a small stuffed animal placed in the trunk of a vehicle which came alive and jumped from side to side to help distribute weight during "spirited driving maneuvers".[1] The Trunk Monkey television ads, loosely based on this concept, were created in 2003 by the advertising agency R/West in Portland, Oregon. Originally created for the Suburban Auto Group of Sandy, Oregon, the syndicated commercials are now the primary source of revenue for the agency. The series of commercials has been licensed to at least 45 car dealerships around the United States as well as New Zealand.