Batman: The Killing Joke

Batman: The Killing Joke

I know, I promised no more Alan Moore. And certainly no more Batman. But look, c'mon, this one is DIFFERENT. For one thing, it really IS a novel -- a single story, conceived as such, and with all the horrific impact that only a single shot (so to speak) can deliver. And Dave Gibbons, of WATCHMEN and GIVE ME LIBERTY has never EVER been better. Not to mention the complete and utter lack of a 'comic book' happy ending. An absolute keeper.

  • Considered by many to be one of the best Batman comics written.

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  • Unearthing unites legendary comic book writer Alan Moore, award-winning photographer Mitch Jenkins and a cast of high-caliber musicians. A bewitching story written and narrated by Moore set against an epic score from musicians inc... Unearthing unites legendary comic book writer Alan Moore, award-winning photographer Mitch Jenkins and a cast of high-caliber musicians. A bewitching story written and narrated by Moore set against an epic score from musicians including Adam Drukker & Andy Broder (aka. Crook&Flail) Mike Patton, Stuart Braithwaite, Zach Hill and Justin Broadrick.

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  • Good grief, will this movie come out already?! I read the graphic novel and wasn't that impressed. It was good, but not as good as I thought it would be. Oh well, I'm more excited about the film which I'll probably go see opening ... Good grief, will this movie come out already?! I read the graphic novel and wasn't that impressed. It was good, but not as good as I thought it would be. Oh well, I'm more excited about the film which I'll probably go see opening night.

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  • Who watching the Watchmen?

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  • Many years ago I saw the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen movie, and remember hearing fans of the book outraged at the treatment. After reading the first volume, I think I can begin to see why. Every character exists in their own... Many years ago I saw the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen movie, and remember hearing fans of the book outraged at the treatment. After reading the first volume, I think I can begin to see why. Every character exists in their own shade of grey here. While at first there seem "good guys" and "bad guys," at times the distinction seems wholly beside the point. This is not your average spy story, but rather a story where that formula is used to ask questions about authority and morality. The story follows the founding of this ill-suited group: Mina Murray (ex-Harker) who is in charge of rounding them up, Captain Nemo, Alan Quartermain, an opium addicted relic, Dr. Jeckyll and his alter-ego Mr. Hyde, and the lecherous invisible man, Hawley Grffin. They aren't told why they're being assembled, or whom they truly work for. All they are told is that, in the uncertain times at the brink of the twentieth century, Britain needs them. Doubts surround them, many of the well founded, but they do their duty to their country. Nothing turns out to be as it seems. Dichotomous notions of good and bad are twisted and turned. There's plenty of mystery and intrigue. Is what they're doing really in the interest of the greater good, and who makes that call? It is also worth noting that the extended prose story, "Allan and the Sundered Veil" that is at the end of the graphic novel is well worth reading, and provides some backstory that is useful for the second volume in the series.

  • Another great installment of the League from Moore. This time he takes the conceit of using characters from literature to a new level, and uses "War of the World" as the scaffolding or this story. I love the twist of incorporating... Another great installment of the League from Moore. This time he takes the conceit of using characters from literature to a new level, and uses "War of the World" as the scaffolding or this story. I love the twist of incorporating Dr. Moreau as well. I wish some of the stuff that happens on Mars at the beginning of the story was fleshed out more, as I found it fascinating. The story-telling is quirky and fun, and it's a very enjoyable ride. The encyclopedia-like almanac at the end has some interesting tidbits in it, and does contain some explanations useful if you plan on reading the Black Dossier, but otherwise I found that section a bit dry.

  • By far one of the most graphicly compelling books — comic or otherwise — available today. The number of insets, varied documents, and sly detail that comprise this book make it a must own for anyone who wants to see what a well-d... By far one of the most graphicly compelling books — comic or otherwise — available today. The number of insets, varied documents, and sly detail that comprise this book make it a must own for anyone who wants to see what a well-designed book should look like. And, of course, it is a brilliantly crafted piece, both in words and images. Kudos to all involved in this.

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  • That was a great, great movie! The plot is a terrorist freedom fighter known only as "V" begins a violent guerilla campaign to destroy those who've succumbed to totalitarianism, and recruits a young woman he's rescued from the sec... That was a great, great movie! The plot is a terrorist freedom fighter known only as "V" begins a violent guerilla campaign to destroy those who've succumbed to totalitarianism, and recruits a young woman he's rescued from the secret police to join him.

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