The Early Birds: A Mother's Story for Our Times

The Early Birds: A Mother's Story for Our Times

From the book description: "In the winter of 2002, Jenny Minton delivered twin boys. She was thirty-one weeks pregnant, and her boys, conceived through in vitro fertilization, were more than two months early. Both boys were placed on immediate life support, and for sixty-four days they hovered, critically ill, in the neonatal intensive care unit of a New York City hospital. The Early Birds is a record of their time there and the story of Minton’s harrowing, triumphant quest to bring her sons home." It's a well written story of the ups and downs of fertility treatments and premature birth. (I've been there having given birth to a 33-weeker and a 36-weeker.) However, it doesn't go far enough. Jenny wonders if fertility treatments give rise to premature births and possible birth effects, but never nails down the evidence or only gives a glimpse of a few studies on this subject. Honestly, this book needs a follow up in about 10 years. Did the fertility treatments result in a risky birth? Was the babies' prematurity cause for any worry down the road? If a child is conceived through "artificial" means, does this affect their intelligence, development and health? Jenny needs to take this story farther.

  • From the book description: "Elinor Mackey has always done the right things in the right order -- college, law school, career, marriage -- but now everything's going wrong. After two painful years of trying, Elinor has learned that... From the book description: "Elinor Mackey has always done the right things in the right order -- college, law school, career, marriage -- but now everything's going wrong. After two painful years of trying, Elinor has learned that she can't have children. All the doctors can tell her is that it's probably because of her age. As she turns forty, she withdraws into an interior world of heartbreak. Elinor's loving husband, Ted, a successful podiatrist, has always done the right thing, too. Then he meets the wrong woman at the wrong time, and does the wrong thing. Ted's lover, Gina -- a beautiful and kindhearted nutritionist -- always eats the right thing, but is unlucky in love and always falls for the wrong men. Soon Ted has to fight to make everything right again. Can Elinor and Ted's marriage be saved? The answer is alarmingly fresh and unexpected as New York Times bestselling author Lolly Winston introduces us to characters as memorable as those of Anne Tyler and Nick Hornby, but who are indelibly all her own. " I found this fictional book a more honest reflection of the strains of infertility than I did with "The Early Birds." Well written, real characters, good dialog and a twist to the ending make this book an enjoyable read.