Space: Japanese Design Solutions for Compact Living

Space: Japanese Design Solutions for Compact Living

I bought this at one of my favorite independent bookshop in Venice Beach, small worlds book on the boardwalk (always support your neighborhood bookshop). The book is full of clever housing ideas and I love the clean lines and modern aesthetics of the Japanese architects. The most amazing is the movement called the 9 tsubo house. a tsubo is a square defined by two tatami mats side by side, or roughly 3.3 m2 or 36 sqft these are tiny houses, but manage not to look cramped.

  • A 500-page compendium of the bleeding edge of art and design, straight from the streets of Tokyo. A gorgeous reference book, cultural guide and imaginative spark for anyone with a penchant for things Japanese. Good gifting.

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  • The internationally renowned interior and retail designer Masamichi Katayama is synonymous with exquisite quality and applies his distinctive trademark showmanship to create visionary retail environments.

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  • I really, really like that part of it is like a basement, but not. Seems so nice and cool!

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  • architecture is about living wellin a given space and limited space is not limited architecture. this book is a guide fo westerners who can't cope with small space without feeling tight and uncomfortable. it's more a concept than... architecture is about living wellin a given space and limited space is not limited architecture. this book is a guide fo westerners who can't cope with small space without feeling tight and uncomfortable. it's more a concept than ideas aout how to build a small house. "Japan is a country with a large population and very limited living space. Due to its mountainous geography, there is a tradition going back centuries for comfortable living in small areas. A classic of Japanese literature is Kamo no Chomei's "Account of a 10-Foot-Square Hut." Traditional Japanese homes are built to be convertible, to maximise space with collapsible furniture that can be stored and multipurpose rooms that can have walls removed to create bigger spaces when necessary. Building on this need and tradition is the current architectural Small House movement, where new homes are built on miniature lots, maximizing the space with a surprising efficiency. There are TV shows and books galore on the topic in Japan, and the ideas are starting to creep over in to the US as well, with book such as "The Very Small Home: Japanese Ideas For Living Well In Limited Space." "The Very Small Home" is a showcase for some of these architectural marvels, eighteen of them to be precise. Each building begins with a different problem to be solved; an ancient tree that must be accommodated by law, a tiny lot in Tokyo that needs to fit two houses. My favorite is the family who each inherited a portion of their parents home. One child inherited the driveway, and needed a long, thin house where he could live in on his section of the land. Going for a traditional feel, the architect created one of the most beautiful homes in the book, complete with tiny garden and a luxurious traditional bath. Many of the solutions are quite ingenious, and the photographs of the homes are beautiful to look at. What the book is not is a guide to better utilizing existing small-space homes. These are definitely architectural solutions, not interior design or decorating solutions. A lot of money went into these houses, and unless you are willing to completely tear down and rebuild your little living space, there won't be much here for you. For what it is, however, the books succeeds very well, and those interested in architecture as well as those looking to build a small home of their own will probably be amazed at the creativity and beauty of these buildings. The homes are much more modern than traditional, featuring the sparsity of modern Japanese design. I can't help but think of a master-crafted piece of sushi, reverently sitting on a pristine white plate. Small, but incredible."Zack davison

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  • I want a plant growing in my house. I have a few, but they are in pots and they die, not grow. I love the natural feel of the stark white. Who knew that was possible?

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  • This fun-house complex was created by Arakawa and Madeline Gins. The Reversible Destiny Lofts are located in Matika a suburb of Tokyo Japan. Prospective sites for Reversible Destiny Lofts are New Jersey and Paris. Each loft costs ... This fun-house complex was created by Arakawa and Madeline Gins. The Reversible Destiny Lofts are located in Matika a suburb of Tokyo Japan. Prospective sites for Reversible Destiny Lofts are New Jersey and Paris. Each loft costs about $750,000. Arakawa and Gins want to eventually create an entire community of the same design. Arakawa has also designed a "experience park" in Japan called Yoro Park. Many visitors have reportedly fallen due to it. (Although since it is located in Japan home of MXC, no one has sued). There are two other proposals on the reversible destiny site, they are all very interesting and fun. The link below has a few additional photos not posted on the official site via "ssp4eva" flickr album. http://www.flickr.com/photos/ssp4eva/67991787/in/photostream/ http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/10415599/site/newsweek/