Bach - Violin Concertos by Mutter, Accardo

Bach - Violin Concertos by Mutter, Accardo

Don't run away so fast. I understand why classical music is such a turn-off for pretty much anyone under 70. The music is often slow, always long (compared to 2 minute pop songs), have no catchy 'hooks', and, to top it all off, there's this enormous amount of pretentious, educational-sounding knowledge that is associated with pretty much anyone into classical music. With all that said though, I think you should give this CD a try. Put it on your iPod or stereo and just listen - listen for 5 minutes. The whole beauty of classical music is the composition, the subtle changes and flashes of brilliance, and the beautiful, completely analog instruments. I have no knowledge of Bach or what keys he composed in. I have no understanding of half of the words printed on these CD's. I know as much about classical music as your probably do. The pieces on this CD are played so well by Mutter (the lead violion) and are at once lively and touching. I recommend listening to the 2nd song of each 3 part piece; these are slow but beautiful. Try it - you might just like it.

  • Wendy Carlos's Switched-On Bach is one of those rare novelty recordings that never gets boring. In the capable hands of Carlos, Bach's keyboard masterpieces sound like they were made for the otherworldly blurps, farts, and chimes ... Wendy Carlos's Switched-On Bach is one of those rare novelty recordings that never gets boring. In the capable hands of Carlos, Bach's keyboard masterpieces sound like they were made for the otherworldly blurps, farts, and chimes of a Moog synthesizer. And, in a sense, they were. Bach's inventive music doesn't lose any of it's contrapuntal punch in these complicated arrangements and, novelties aside, the playing is great on this Grammy Award-winning classic. Whether performing Bach's "Two-Part Inventions," "Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring," or "Wachet Auf," Carlos offers one-of-a-kind interpretations, her synthesizers still sounding as otherworldly as they did in 1968. This is one of those weird and wonderful classical releases that anyone--classical scholar or pop enthusiast--can enjoy. A Switched-On box set exists, capturing most of Carlos's baroque-gone-berserk output, but this is the disc that started it all. In a word, fun. --Jason Verlinde