Cosmo's Factory: Creedence Clearwater Revival: Music

Cosmo's Factory: Creedence Clearwater Revival: Music

Though often misinterpreted as the less hep of their late 60s Rock companions, CCR remains iconic by all standards. They've got all sorts of material worth singing alogn to, but this, their 1970 LP, remains my favorite.

  • Box set of CCR remastered and on amazingly perfect sounding audiophile vinyl. Sooooo awesome

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  • Susie-Q, I Put a Spell on You, Proud Mary, Bad Moon Rising, Lodi, Green River, Commotion, Down on the Corner, Fortunate Son, Travelin' Band, Who'll Stop the Rain, Up Around the Bend, Run Through the Jungle, Lookin' Out My Back Doo... Susie-Q, I Put a Spell on You, Proud Mary, Bad Moon Rising, Lodi, Green River, Commotion, Down on the Corner, Fortunate Son, Travelin' Band, Who'll Stop the Rain, Up Around the Bend, Run Through the Jungle, Lookin' Out My Back Door, Long as I Can See the Light, I Heard It Through the Grapevine, Have You Ever Seen the Rain?, Hey Tonight, Sweet Hitch-Hiker, Someday Never Comes

  • During 1969 and 1970, CCR was dismissed by hipsters as a bubblegum pop band and the sniping had grown intolerable, at least to John Fogerty, who designed Pendulum as a rebuke to critics. He spent time polishing the production, bri... During 1969 and 1970, CCR was dismissed by hipsters as a bubblegum pop band and the sniping had grown intolerable, at least to John Fogerty, who designed Pendulum as a rebuke to critics. He spent time polishing the production, bringing in keyboards, horns, even a vocal choir. His songs became self-consciously serious and tighter, working with the aesthetic of the rock underground -- Pendulum was constructed as a proper album, contrasting dramatically with CCR's previous records, all throwbacks to joyous early rock records where covers sat nicely next to hits and overlooked gems tucked away at the end of the second side. To some fans of classic CCR, this approach may feel a little odd since only "Have You Ever Seen the Rain" and maybe its B-side "Hey Tonight" sound undeniably like prime Creedence. But, given time, the album is a real grower, revealing many overlooked Fogerty gems. Yes, it isn't transcendent like the albums they made from Bayou Country through Cosmo's Factory, but most bands never even come close to that kind of hot streak. Instead, Pendulum finds a first-class songwriter and craftsman pushing himself and his band to try new sounds, styles, and textures. His ambition results in a stumble -- "Rude Awakening 2" portentously teeters on the verge of prog-rock, something CCR just can't pull off -- but the rest of the record is excellent, with such great numbers as the bluesy groove "Pagan Baby," the soulful vamp "Chameleon," the moody "It's Just a Thought," and the raver "Molina." Most bands would kill for this to be their best stuff, and the fact that it's tucked away on an album that even some fans forget illustrates what a tremendous band Creedence Clearwater Revival was. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine, All Music Guide « less… more »

  • By Creedence Clearwater Revival - JVC Victor (2005) - Contemporary Pop/Rock, Country-Rock, Rock & Roll Rock

  • Creedence Clearwater Revisited is a Creedence Clearwater Revival cover band that just happens to have the rhythm section, bassist Stu Cook and drummer Doug Clifford, from the original band, which means they do versions of Creedenc... Creedence Clearwater Revisited is a Creedence Clearwater Revival cover band that just happens to have the rhythm section, bassist Stu Cook and drummer Doug Clifford, from the original band, which means they do versions of Creedence's songs that sound almost exactly like the original versions. ~ Steve Leggett, All Music Guide

  • It's fitting that the first single by Creedence Clearwater Revival to hit the radio was the group's cover of Louisiana-born Dale Hawkins' "Susie Q" because that swampy deep south sound was what Creedence's main man, the California... It's fitting that the first single by Creedence Clearwater Revival to hit the radio was the group's cover of Louisiana-born Dale Hawkins' "Susie Q" because that swampy deep south sound was what Creedence's main man, the California-born John Fogerty, aimed for in his songs dealing with a mythic, half-dreamed American south, and in the process, Creedence Clearwater Revival ended up being perhaps the greatest singles band of the 1970s. This succinct collection has most of the group's essential tracks, including "Susie Q" (unfortunately not the superior, longer album version), "Born on the Bayou," the joyous "Down on the Corner," the poignant "Have You Ever Seen the Rain," and, of course, the ubiquitous "Proud Mary." There's more to the story, of course, but the basic outline of a great band is here. ~ Steve Leggett, All Music Guide « less… more »

  • By Creedence Clearwater Revival - Analogue Productions (2009) - AM Pop, Contemporary Pop/Rock, Rock & Roll Rock

  • Released in the summer of 1968 -- a year after the summer of love, but still in the thick of the Age of Aquarius - Creedence Clearwater Revival's self-titled debut album was gloriously out-of-step with the times, teeming with John... Released in the summer of 1968 -- a year after the summer of love, but still in the thick of the Age of Aquarius - Creedence Clearwater Revival's self-titled debut album was gloriously out-of-step with the times, teeming with John Fogerty's Americana fascinations. While many of Fogerty's obsessions and CCR's signatures are in place -- weird blues ("I Put a Spell on You"), Stax R&B (Wilson Pickett's "Ninety-Nine and a Half"), rockabilly ("Susie Q"), winding instrumental interplay, the swamp sound, and songs for "The Working Man" -- the band was still finding their way. Out of all their records (discounting Mardi Gras), this is the one that sounds the most like its era, thanks to the wordless vocal harmonies toward the end of "Susie Q," the backward guitars on "Gloomy," and the directionless, awkward jamming that concludes "Walking on the Water." Still, the band's sound is vibrant, with gutsy arrangements that borrow equally from Sun, Stax, and the swamp. Fogerty's songwriting is a little tentative. Not for nothing were two of the three singles pulled from the album covers (Dale Hawkins' "Susie Q," Screamin' Jay Hawkins' "I Put a Spell on You") -- he wasn't an accomplished tunesmith yet. Though "The Working Man" isn't bad, the true exception is that third single, "Porterville," an exceptional song with great hooks, an underlying sense of menace, and the first inkling of the working-class rage that fueled such landmarks as "Fortunate Son." It's the song that points the way to the breakthrough of Bayou Country, but the rest of the album shouldn't be dismissed, because judged simply against the rock & roll of its time, it rises above its peers. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine, All Music Guide « less… more »

  • By Creedence Clearwater Revival - Fantasy (1998) - Contemporary Pop/Rock, Country-Rock, Rock & Roll Susie-Q, Who'll Stop the Rain, Green River

  • Proud Mary, Before You Accuse Me, Green River, Born on the Bayou, Susie Q, Looking for a Reason, Bad Moon Rising, Sweet Hitch-Hiker, Down on the Corner, Up Around the Bend, Lodi, Who'll Stop the Rain, Cotton Fields, I Put a Spell ... Proud Mary, Before You Accuse Me, Green River, Born on the Bayou, Susie Q, Looking for a Reason, Bad Moon Rising, Sweet Hitch-Hiker, Down on the Corner, Up Around the Bend, Lodi, Who'll Stop the Rain, Cotton Fields, I Put a Spell on You, Looking out My Back Door, Good Golly Miss Molly, Hey Tonight, It Came Out of the Sky, Long as I Can See the Light, Hello Mary Lou, Have You Ever Seen the Rain?

  • By Creedence Clearwater Revival - Concord/Universal (2009) - Contemporary Pop/Rock, Country-Rock, Rock & Roll

  • This 2008 best-of from Universal collects 24 tracks from the seminal '60s folk/blues/country-rock legends on a single disc. While the package may offer little in the way of liner notes and other bonus material, it's as good a sing... This 2008 best-of from Universal collects 24 tracks from the seminal '60s folk/blues/country-rock legends on a single disc. While the package may offer little in the way of liner notes and other bonus material, it's as good a single-disc retrospective as one could hope for, balancing all of the radio hits that made 1976's Chronicle, Vol. 1 and 1986's Chronicle, Vol. 2 the gold standard for most listeners. The sound is exquisite, and while some of the band's beloved deep cuts like "Pagan Baby" and "Epitaph" are nowhere to be found, it's the most comprehensive "hits" collection out there (to date). The only downside (depending on one's preferences) is the appearance of the single 45-rpm edits of "I Heard It Through the Grapevine" and "Suzie Q," but the brevity works in context with the rest of the set, which includes enough classic rock staples like "Have You Ever Seen the Rain," "Long as I Can See the Light," "Up and Around the Bend," "Lookin' Out My Back Door," and "Born on the Bayou" to fuel a billion nasty commutes. ~ James Christopher Monger, All Music Guide « less… more »

  • By Creedence Clearwater Revival - Classic Rock Legends Ltd. (2006) - Contemporary Pop/Rock, Country-Rock, Rock & Roll

  • Hot Stuff is an entertaining but rather useless compilation of ten random highlights from Creedence Clearwater Revival's career, pulling both singles and album tracks. A couple of choices may be a little suspect, but several of Jo... Hot Stuff is an entertaining but rather useless compilation of ten random highlights from Creedence Clearwater Revival's career, pulling both singles and album tracks. A couple of choices may be a little suspect, but several of John Fogerty's best songs -- "Born on the Bayou," "Bootleg," "Bad Moon Rising," "Wrote a Song for Everyone" -- are here, even if there's no rhyme or reason to the collection. Chronicle is better for casual fans, and the actual albums are necessary for diehards, but Hot Stuff remains an entertaining sampler nonetheless. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine, All Music Guide

  • Creedence Gold is a collection of Creedence Clearwater Revival's hit singles. Unfortunately, the album is a little too small to meet anybody's needs. A mere eight tracks are featured on Creedence Gold. Admittedly, these are eight ... Creedence Gold is a collection of Creedence Clearwater Revival's hit singles. Unfortunately, the album is a little too small to meet anybody's needs. A mere eight tracks are featured on Creedence Gold. Admittedly, these are eight tracks of amazing quality, but those looking for a more thorough collection will be pleased with the much more in-depth Chronicle, Vol. 1. Creedence Gold shows off the musical talent involved in the band. The 11-plus-minute "I Heard It Through the Grapevine" is a fine showcase for Creedence's lead guitar styling, while "Born on the Bayou" is a fine sampler of how the band worked as a unit. By no means is Creedence Gold a bad album. Indeed, the eight tracks featured are eight of the best moments in their respective genres. As a compilation of Creedence's career, however, Creedence Gold fails miserably. ~ Ben Davies, All Music Guide « less… more »

  • Someday Never Comes, Hello Mary Lou, Sweet Hitch-Hiker

  • Opening slowly with the dark, swampy "Born on the Bayou," Bayou Country reveals an assured Creedence Clearwater Revival, a band that has found its voice between their first and second album. It's not just that "Born on the Bayou" ... Opening slowly with the dark, swampy "Born on the Bayou," Bayou Country reveals an assured Creedence Clearwater Revival, a band that has found its voice between their first and second album. It's not just that "Born on the Bayou" announces that CCR has discovered its sound -- it reveals the extent of John Fogerty's myth-making. With this song, he sketches out his persona; it makes him sound as if he crawled out of the backwoods of Louisiana instead of being a native San Franciscan. He carries this illusion throughout the record, through the ominous meanderings of "Graveyard Train" through the stoked cover of "Good Golly Miss Molly" to "Keep on Chooglin'," which rides out a southern-fried groove for nearly eight minutes. At the heart of Bayou Country, as well as Fogerty's myth and Creedence's entire career, is "Proud Mary." A riverboat tale where the narrator leaves a good job in the city for a life rolling down the river, the song is filled with details that ring so true that it feels autobiographical. The lyric is married to music that is utterly unique yet curiously timeless, blending rockabilly, country, and Stax R&B into something utterly distinctive and addictive. "Proud Mary" is the emotional fulcrum at the center of Fogerty's seductive imaginary Americana, and while it's the best song here, his other songs are no slouch, either. "Born on the Bayou" is a magnificent piece of swamp-rock, "Penthouse Pauper" is a first-rate rocker with the angry undertow apparent on "Porterville" and "Bootleg" is a minor masterpiece, thanks to its tough acoustic foundation, sterling guitar work, and clever story. All the songs add up to a superb statement of purpose, a record that captures Creedence Clearwater Revival's muscular, spare, deceptively simple sound as an evocative portrait of America. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine, All Music Guide « less… more »

  • The Midnight Special, Proud Mary, I Heard It Through the Grapevine, Bad Moon Rising, Keep on Chooglin', Who'll Stop the Rain, Fortunate Son, Hey Tonight, Born on the Bayou, Lookin' Out My Back Door, Run Through the Jungle, Susie-Q... The Midnight Special, Proud Mary, I Heard It Through the Grapevine, Bad Moon Rising, Keep on Chooglin', Who'll Stop the Rain, Fortunate Son, Hey Tonight, Born on the Bayou, Lookin' Out My Back Door, Run Through the Jungle, Susie-Q, Up Around the Bend

  • This double-CD set is maddening. One would like to assail it as utterly superfluous, in light of the fact that every note of music CCR ever cut is readily available, and the existence of John Fogerty's 1998 concert release of his ... This double-CD set is maddening. One would like to assail it as utterly superfluous, in light of the fact that every note of music CCR ever cut is readily available, and the existence of John Fogerty's 1998 concert release of his own repertory; but these are 22 good songs, played well, and thus, it's not easy to deride them. In actual fact, apart from transcendent readings of "Run Through the Jungle" and "Heard It Through the Grapevine," there isn't too much worthwhile on Recollection, cut in the fall of 1997 at a series of concerts in western Canada, that fans of CCR won't find better represented on any of the group's original albums or best-of compilations. But there are some attempts at freshness here that do succeed -- the group's original extended version of "Heard It Through the Grapevine" was not one of its more inspired moments, and Elliot Easton does inject some excitement here in the form of serious guitar pyrotechnics. On the other hand, the presence of backing vocals on "Bad Moon Rising" demonstrates that the band was mimicking the records rather than trying for a real concert sound on part of this set. The harmonizing on "Have You Ever Seen the Rain," however, actually improves the song, and they attack "Fortunate Son" at a slightly slower tempo than the original, which works better; but "Travelin' Band" works less well in its marginally slowed-down version. CCRevisited play with lots of enthusiasm, which is understandable -- not only did Cook and Clifford spend so many years performing this repertory nightly that they could probably play it properly in their sleep, but it's unlikely that they (or any of the others present) will ever have as fine a body of songs to work with. The 22 songs are drawn from the hits and popular album tracks, and it's notable (and fortunate) that none of Cook or Clifford's songwriting attempts from the final CCR effort are included. The pity is they didn't reach out to some of the lesser known CCR gems, such as "Cross-Tie Walker." The sound is very good, incidentally. ~ Bruce Eder, All Music Guide « less… more »

  • It could be argued that Creedence Clearwater Revival were the greatest American rock & roll band, and one convincing argument would be that no other of their peers had such a commanding grasp on a variety of American music and cou... It could be argued that Creedence Clearwater Revival were the greatest American rock & roll band, and one convincing argument would be that no other of their peers had such a commanding grasp on a variety of American music and could synthesize them in such a bracingly original fashion. It's that synthesis that makes a genre-specific compilation like Creedence Country so difficult to pull off -- it's hard to single out one strand from that mix, particularly since CCR didn't so much perform country as absorb its influence. In fact, only a handful of songs could be appropriately classified as "country" -- the slow-crawling opener "Lookin' for a Reason," the peerless lament "Lodi," the similarly heartbroken "Wrote a Song for Everyone," maybe the bouncy "Lookin' Out My Back Door," which can sound like the streets of Bakersfield, and perhaps their driving cover of Leadbelly's "Cotton Fields," which winds up as rock & roll. The rest of it is either flat-out rockabilly, whether it's a cover of "My Baby Left Me" or John Fogerty's "Don't Look Now," or flat-out rock & roll like "Cross-Tie Walker" -- and it's hard to believe that anybody could call the elongated, menacing jam of "Ramble Tamble" country. That said, it's a thoroughly enjoyable listen, since nearly all the music is excellent, but it doesn't really present any insight into the band -- it's just a good mixtape. [Ironically, it's a mixtape that was hurt by the inclusion of bonus tracks in its 2004 expanded reissue. Three bonus tracks were added to the end of the album -- the best is Fogerty's "It's Just a Thought," a solid album track from Pendulum, but it's preceded by two awful Doug Clifford-sung selections from that album that may be closer to purer country than anything on the proper Creedence Country album, but they're nowhere near as good as what came before. It doesn't ruin the collection, but it does wound it. Also, the credits on the back cover have not been updated; they fail to note that Tom Fogerty doesn't play on two of the bonus cuts and John Fogerty doesn't sing lead on two of them.] ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine, All Music Guide « less… more »

  • Opening slowly with the dark, swampy "Born on the Bayou," Bayou Country reveals an assured Creedence Clearwater Revival, a band that has found its voice between their first and second album. It's not just that "Born on the Bayou" ... Opening slowly with the dark, swampy "Born on the Bayou," Bayou Country reveals an assured Creedence Clearwater Revival, a band that has found its voice between their first and second album. It's not just that "Born on the Bayou" announces that CCR has discovered its sound -- it reveals the extent of John Fogerty's myth-making. With this song, he sketches out his persona; it makes him sound as if he crawled out of the backwoods of Louisiana instead of being a native San Franciscan. He carries this illusion throughout the record, through the ominous meanderings of "Graveyard Train" through the stoked cover of "Good Golly Miss Molly" to "Keep on Chooglin'," which rides out a southern-fried groove for nearly eight minutes. At the heart of Bayou Country, as well as Fogerty's myth and Creedence's entire career, is "Proud Mary." A riverboat tale where the narrator leaves a good job in the city for a life rolling down the river, the song is filled with details that ring so true that it feels autobiographical. The lyric is married to music that is utterly unique yet curiously timeless, blending rockabilly, country, and Stax R&B into something utterly distinctive and addictive. "Proud Mary" is the emotional fulcrum at the center of Fogerty's seductive imaginary Americana, and while it's the best song here, his other songs are no slouch, either. "Born on the Bayou" is a magnificent piece of swamp-rock, "Penthouse Pauper" is a first-rate rocker with the angry undertow apparent on "Porterville" and "Bootleg" is a minor masterpiece, thanks to its tough acoustic foundation, sterling guitar work, and clever story. All the songs add up to a superb statement of purpose, a record that captures Creedence Clearwater Revival's muscular, spare, deceptively simple sound as an evocative portrait of America. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine, All Music Guide « less… more »

  • This album has often taken it on the chin from fans and critics who failed to perceive its value. Long regarded as an inferior release, mostly because it emerged at the tail-end of CCR's history, after Tom Fogerty had quit, and ca... This album has often taken it on the chin from fans and critics who failed to perceive its value. Long regarded as an inferior release, mostly because it emerged at the tail-end of CCR's history, after Tom Fogerty had quit, and came from the tour associated with unpopular Mardi Gras album, Live In Europe was considered something of a bummer. Neither the original LP release (which spread under an hour of music onto four sides), nor the edited domestic CD presented much to enjoy -- the band sounded flat and harsh. Victor Entertainment's 1998 remastering from Japan, in 20-bit sound off the uncut tape (which restores two songs off the original LP that are missing from the American CD), rectifies those mistakes and more. It puts the listener seemingly at the concert (and center-stage in the stereo mix) in terms of the closeness of the sound, and gives us a chance to hear how spirited and refreshed CCR was performing as a trio. The band reinvented songs they'd originally cut as a quartet in blazing fury, with Doug Clifford pounding away with a rock-solid beat, Stu Cook's bass doing graceful acrobatics covering for the "missing" rhythm guitar, and John Fogerty in a soaring virtuoso performance that must've cost him five pounds in sweat alone each night on this tour. The 20-bit audio gives the band a close, loud, crunching sound like a Chuck Berry performance on 50,000 watts of amplification and, given the animated nature of the performance, the whole album now makes for bracing as well as fascinating listening, with "Keep On Chooglin'" a great way to end the official history of the band, assuming that it had to end. The original tape always had some minor flaws, in terms of microphone placement and mixing, but the Victor reissue minimizes them. As a bonus, the Japanese CD restores Stu Cook's "Door To Door," (one of the better non-Fogerty numbers off of Mardi Gras), to the song lineup. The album doesn't appear to offer much, but with "Sweet Hitch-Hiker," "Up Around The Bend," "Hey Tonight," or "It Came Out of the Sky," much less "Proud Mary," "Green River," or "Lodi," there is still no earthly reason for it to be dropped by Fantasy when it was issued on CD. The price is high, but the music is worth it. (Japanese import) ~ Bruce Eder, All Music Guide « less… more »

  • Throughout 1969 and into 1970, CCR toured incessantly and recorded nearly as much. Appropriately, Cosmo's Factory's first single was the working band's anthem "Travelin' Band," a funny, piledriving rocker with a blaring horn secti... Throughout 1969 and into 1970, CCR toured incessantly and recorded nearly as much. Appropriately, Cosmo's Factory's first single was the working band's anthem "Travelin' Band," a funny, piledriving rocker with a blaring horn section -- the first indication their sonic palette was broadening. Two more singles appeared prior to the album's release, backed by John Fogerty originals that rivaled the A-side or paled just slightly. When it came time to assemble a full album, Fogerty had only one original left, the claustrophobic, paranoid rocker "Ramble Tamble." Unlike some extended instrumentals, this was dramatic and had a direction -- a distinction made clear by the meandering jam that brings CCR's version of "I Heard It Through the Grapevine" to 11 minutes. Even if it wanders, their take on the Marvin Gaye classic isn't unpleasant, and their faithful, exuberant takes on the Sun classics "Ooby Dooby" and "My Baby Left Me" are joyous tributes. Still, the heart of the album lays in those six fantastic songs released on singles. "Up Around the Bend" is a searing rocker, one of their best, balanced by the menacing murkiness of "Run Through the Jungle." "Who'll Stop the Rain"'s poignant melody and melancholy undertow has a counterpart in Fogerty's dope song, "Lookin' out My Back Door," a charming, bright shuffle, filled with dancing animals and domestic bliss - he had never been as sweet and silly as he is here. On "Long as I Can See the Light," the record's final song, he again finds solace in home, anchored by a soulful, laid-back groove. It hits a comforting, elegiac note, the perfect way to draw Cosmo's Factory -- an album made during stress and chaos, filled with raging rockers, covers, and intense jams -- to a close. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine, All Music Guide « less… more »

  • If anything, CCR's third album Green River represents the full flower of their classic sound initially essayed on its predecessor, Bayou Country. One of the differences between the two albums is that Green River is tighter, with n... If anything, CCR's third album Green River represents the full flower of their classic sound initially essayed on its predecessor, Bayou Country. One of the differences between the two albums is that Green River is tighter, with none of the five-minute-plus jams that filled out both their debut and Bayou Country, but the true key to its success is a peak in John Fogerty's creativity. Although CCR had at least one cover on each album, they relied on Fogerty to crank out new material every month. He was writing so frequently that the craft became second-nature and he laid his emotions and fears bare, perhaps unintentionally. Perhaps that's why Green River has fear, anger, dread, and weariness creeping on the edges of gleeful music. This was a band that played rock & roll so joyously that they masked the, well, "sinister" undercurrents in Fogerty's songs. "Bad Moon Rising" has the famous line "Hope you've got your things together/Hope you're quite prepared to die," but that was only the most obvious indication of Fogerty's gloom. Consider all the other dark touches: the "Sinister purpose knocking at your door"; the chaos of "Commotion"; the threat of death in "Tombstone Shadow"; you only return to the idyllic "Green River" once you get lost and realize the "world is smolderin'." Even the ballads have a strong melancholy undercurrent, highlighted by "Lodi," where Fogerty imagines himself stuck playing in dead-end towns for the rest of his life. Not the typical thoughts of a newly famous rock & roller, but certainly an indication of Fogerty's inner tumult. For all its darkness, Green River is ultimately welcoming music, since the band rocks hard and bright and the melancholy feels comforting, not alienating. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine, All Music Guide « less… more »

  • The 2009 Singles Collection offers something that the many other previous Creedence Clearwater Revival compilations do not: the band's A-sides and B-sides presented complete and in chronological order, plus a DVD containing the fi... The 2009 Singles Collection offers something that the many other previous Creedence Clearwater Revival compilations do not: the band's A-sides and B-sides presented complete and in chronological order, plus a DVD containing the five promo clips CCR released ("Sweet Hitch-Hiker," "I Heard It Through the Grapevine," "Bootleg," "I Put a Spell on You," "Lookin' Out My Back Door"). This focus means there are songs here that never make most CCR hits collections -- the A-side "Porterville," but generally flips like "Call It Pretending," "Walk on the Water," "Door to Door," and "Tearin' Up the Country," plus the "45 Revolutions Per Minute" oddity -- but apart from that, this covers familiar, albeit still enjoyable, territory.~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine, All Music Guide « less… more »

  • Chronicle, Vol. 2 effectively compiles all of the highlights from Creedence Clearwater Revival's career that weren't on the first volume. All of the singles were included on Chronicle, Vol. 1, so Chronicle, Vol. 2 is comprised sol... Chronicle, Vol. 2 effectively compiles all of the highlights from Creedence Clearwater Revival's career that weren't on the first volume. All of the singles were included on Chronicle, Vol. 1, so Chronicle, Vol. 2 is comprised solely of album tracks. That doesn't mean these are lesser items. On the contrary, the majority of these songs -- "Born on the Bayou," "Tombstone Shadow," "Wrote a Song for Everyone," "It Came out of the Sky," and "Midnight Special" -- rank among their best performances. Of course, a couple of great tracks remain on CCR's individual albums, notably "Bootleg," but Chronicle, Vol. 2, All Music Guide

  • Chronicle, Vol. 1 contains every one of Creedence Clearwater Revival's original 19 hit singles -- including "Proud Mary," "Bad Moon Rising," "Green River," "Down on the Corner," "Travelin' Band," "Up Around the Band," and "Have Yo... Chronicle, Vol. 1 contains every one of Creedence Clearwater Revival's original 19 hit singles -- including "Proud Mary," "Bad Moon Rising," "Green River," "Down on the Corner," "Travelin' Band," "Up Around the Band," and "Have You Ever Seen the Rain" -- plus "I Heard It Through the Grapevine," which became a hit at the same time this double-record compilation was released. It's a lean, concise collection that tells you everything you need to know about Creedence. Several of the band's individual albums are essential, but Chronicle is not only an excellent introduction to the group, it offers definitive proof that the group was one of the definitive singles' bands of the late '60s. Rarely has a greatest- hits collection been so well-assembled. [The compact disc edition is hampered by the inclusion of the full-length, 11-minute album version of "I Heard It Through the Grapevine"; its presence slows down the momentum of the collection considerably.] ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine, All Music Guide « less… more »