Darwin's Dangerous Idea: Evolution and the Meanings of Life by Daniel C. Dennett

Darwin's Dangerous Idea: Evolution and the Meanings of Life by Daniel C. Dennett

Daniel Dennett's book, Darwin's Dangerous Idea is a brilliantly written book about not just evolution, but the social implications of naturalism, science and evolution. Dennett's a brilliant and evocative philosopher, a witty public speaker and an apologist for reason and rationality. This book is a must read... absolutely.

  • Behe's book, Darwin's Black Box was an interesting case of what he calls "irreducible complexity". The basic idea is that there are things in the natural world that are so complex, that natural selection cannot be the causing age... Behe's book, Darwin's Black Box was an interesting case of what he calls "irreducible complexity". The basic idea is that there are things in the natural world that are so complex, that natural selection cannot be the causing agent, hence, he deduces an intelligent designer. It's a well written book and at times, a good critique on evolution, however, what this book lacks is real evidence for intelligent design. Unfortunately, because science is empirical in nature, and naturalistic in scope, any claims of the supernatural cannot be tested, repeated or measured... and this is what Behe's book and intelligent design lacks. The core argument sets up a dichotomy that says "there are problems with evolution and natural selection... so intelligent design must be right". It describes some of the problems with evolution, but brings no positive evidence for intelligent design (ID). Overall, an interesting read, but more hypothetical and philosophical than scientific.