Chocolate Skateboards: Devine Calloway Hand Signs Deck

Chocolate Skateboards: Devine Calloway Hand Signs Deck

The raised fist (also other names, including red fist and clenched fist) is a salute most often used by political and social activists of a leftist, anti-fascist, or simply anti-capitalist orientation, such as Marxists, anarchists, communists, pacifists, trade unionists, and black nationalists. Generally the fist is regarded as an expression of solidarity, strength or defiance. The salute has also been known as the clenched fist or closed fist. Additionally, different movements sometimes use different terms to describe the raised fist salute: amongst communists and socialists it is sometimes called the red salute, whereas amongst black rights activists, especially in the United States of America it has been called the black power salute. During the Spanish Civil War, it was sometimes known as the anti-fascist salute In this particular case it simbolizes the power of skateboard master Devine Calloway. Uh-huh!!

  • Marc Johnson's Chocolate Skateboard Hand Signs Deck has origins that go back to old historic texts. It is identified as the digitus impudicus (impudent finger) in Ancient Roman writings and reference is made to using the finger in... Marc Johnson's Chocolate Skateboard Hand Signs Deck has origins that go back to old historic texts. It is identified as the digitus impudicus (impudent finger) in Ancient Roman writings and reference is made to using the finger in ancient Greek comedy to insult another person. The widespread usage of the finger in many cultures is likely due to the geographical influence of the Roman Empire and Greco-Roman civilization. Another possible origin of this gesture can be found in the first-century Mediterranean world, where extending the digitus impudicus was one of many methods used to divert the ever present threat of the evil eye Yo, Dude!

  • Justin Eldridge's Chocolate Skateboards Hand Signs Deck features the "shaka" sign--YEAH! The "shaka" sign is a common greeting gesture. It is often associated with Hawaii. Hawaiian locals use the shaka for various meanings, li... Justin Eldridge's Chocolate Skateboards Hand Signs Deck features the "shaka" sign--YEAH! The "shaka" sign is a common greeting gesture. It is often associated with Hawaii. Hawaiian locals use the shaka for various meanings, like "all right", "cool", "smooth", etc. Residents of states other than Hawaii who use the shaka may describe it as meaning "hang loose" and in California, the symbol itself is more commonly called the "hang loose" sign rather than the "Shaka" sign. It is also used to convey what locals in Hawai'i call the "Aloha Spirit," a gesture of friendship and understanding between the various ethnic cultures that reside within Hawai'i. It can also be used to signal a "hello", "goodbye", " 'till next time", "take care", "Alright!" In sign language, the shaka is one of the two signs used to refer to surfing. Oh and the shaka sign resembles the American Sign Language letter for "Y".

  • The V sign is a hand gesture in which the first and second fingers are raised and parted, whilst the remaining fingers are clenched. In the United Kingdom and some other English speaking countries, it is an obscene insulting gestu... The V sign is a hand gesture in which the first and second fingers are raised and parted, whilst the remaining fingers are clenched. In the United Kingdom and some other English speaking countries, it is an obscene insulting gesture of defiance when performed with the palm facing inwards. During World War II, Winston Churchill popularised its use as a "Victory" sign (for V as in victory) initially with palm inwards and later in the war palm outwards. In the United States, with the palm outwards, and more recently, occasionally inward as well, it is also used to mean "Peace", a meaning that became popular during the peace movement of the 1960s. Here we have it again on Kenny Anderson's victorious deck--dope!