Modest Mouse - Man Man Poster

Modest Mouse - Man Man Poster

Bitter sweet poster design for Modest Mouse/Man Man gig. Nicely done

  • Long awaited record re-release.

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  • Modest Mouse's Epic debut, The Moon & Antarctica, finds them strangely subdued, focusing on mortality as well as the moody, acoustic side of their music and downplaying the edgy, spastic rock that helped make them indie stars. Not... Modest Mouse's Epic debut, The Moon & Antarctica, finds them strangely subdued, focusing on mortality as well as the moody, acoustic side of their music and downplaying the edgy, spastic rock that helped make them indie stars. Not that their first major-label release sounds like a sellout -- actually, the slight sheen of Brian Deck's production enhances the album's introspective tone -- but occasionally The Moon & Antarctica's melancholy becomes ponderous. Unfortunately, the album's middle stretch contains three such songs, "The Cold Part," "Alone Down There," and "The Stars Are… more »

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  • Sad Sappy Sucker is Modest Mouse's "lost album." It was recorded by K Records' Calvin Johnson in 1994 and was supposed to be the band's debut, but delays shelved the record and it disappeared. The 2001 release of Sad Sappy Sucker ... Sad Sappy Sucker is Modest Mouse's "lost album." It was recorded by K Records' Calvin Johnson in 1994 and was supposed to be the band's debut, but delays shelved the record and it disappeared. The 2001 release of Sad Sappy Sucker gives fans an opportunity to see the humble beginnings of one of the Pacific Northwest's most original bands. All 12 songs recorded during the Dub Narcotic Studio sessions are on the album, including the impossible to find Worms Vs. Birds 7". As a bonus treat, there are nine songs from Isaac Brock's Dial-a-Song project. These were on his answering machine every day and could only be… more »

  • Talk about original -- this band has something for just about everyone. They can do quiet, brooding acoustics like "Bankrupt on Selling," dark and pounding thrashers like "Cowboy Dan," funky jump-around emo like "Jesus Christ Was ... Talk about original -- this band has something for just about everyone. They can do quiet, brooding acoustics like "Bankrupt on Selling," dark and pounding thrashers like "Cowboy Dan," funky jump-around emo like "Jesus Christ Was an Only Child" -- just about anything. Throughout the whole album is a white-trash feeling and a sort of down-to-earth analysis of the state of the world, without sounding pretentious. Give this album a listen and you can be sure that you will be singing the rambling, catchy, almost whiny vocals in no time. If you dig indie rock at its very best, go pick this album up. ~ Blake Butler,… more »

  • Building Nothing Out of Something collects Modest Mouse singles and rare tracks from the group's indie-label years, including the studio tracks from the Interstate 8 EP and their contributions to the Sub Pop Singles Club. Despite ... Building Nothing Out of Something collects Modest Mouse singles and rare tracks from the group's indie-label years, including the studio tracks from the Interstate 8 EP and their contributions to the Sub Pop Singles Club. Despite the songs' motley origins, Building Nothing Out of Something works well as an album, balancing the group's quirky and often poignant pop songs with their more abrasive rock side. The wonderfully dreamy, off-kilter "Interstate 8" and "Workin' on Leavin' the Livin'" (which cleverly quotes Eraserhead's "Lady in the Radiator Song") are two shining examples of the… more »

  • Modest Mouse's Epic debut, The Moon & Antarctica, finds them strangely subdued, focusing on mortality as well as the moody, acoustic side of their music and downplaying the edgy, spastic rock that helped make them indie stars. Not... Modest Mouse's Epic debut, The Moon & Antarctica, finds them strangely subdued, focusing on mortality as well as the moody, acoustic side of their music and downplaying the edgy, spastic rock that helped make them indie stars. Not that their first major-label release sounds like a sellout -- actually, the slight sheen of Brian Deck's production enhances the album's introspective tone -- but occasionally The Moon & Antarctica's melancholy becomes ponderous. Unfortunately, the album's middle stretch contains three such songs, "The Cold Part," "Alone Down There," and "The Stars Are… more »

  • After more than a decade with Modest Mouse, Isaac Brock still sounds young and weird and searching, and never more so than on Good News for People Who Love Bad News, which follows the band's meditative The Moon & Antarctica with a... After more than a decade with Modest Mouse, Isaac Brock still sounds young and weird and searching, and never more so than on Good News for People Who Love Bad News, which follows the band's meditative The Moon & Antarctica with a set of songs that are more focused, but also less obviously profound. The occasionally indulgent feel of The Moon & Antarctica allowed Modest Mouse the room to make epic statements about life, death, and the afterlife; while Good News for People Who Love Bad News is equally concerned with mortality and spirituality, it has a more active, immediate feel that makes its comments on these subjects that much… more »

  • Now that Modest Mouse have fully established themselves as a major-label indie rock band -- no longer an oxymoron! -- with the success of 2004's Good News for People Who Love Bad News (though they had actually been on Sony, throug... Now that Modest Mouse have fully established themselves as a major-label indie rock band -- no longer an oxymoron! -- with the success of 2004's Good News for People Who Love Bad News (though they had actually been on Sony, through Epic, since 2000's The Moon & Antarctica), they face the difficult task of trying to follow up a mainstream hit while still retaining the adroit quirkiness that won them fans in the first place. Finding that space between "creativity" and "accessibility" is not easy, but the band (with help from Johnny Marr, among others) is probably as well, if not better, equipped as anyone to… more »

  • There's a slight shift in Modest Mouse's sound on this album, but that shouldn't be surprising, given the addition of famed Smith's guitarist Johnny Marr. Who know how much the addition shifted the soundscape, but I find this alb... There's a slight shift in Modest Mouse's sound on this album, but that shouldn't be surprising, given the addition of famed Smith's guitarist Johnny Marr. Who know how much the addition shifted the soundscape, but I find this album to be a bit catchier than the previous. Issac Brok's vocal style seems to focus a bit more on the shouty end of the spectrum, on songs like "Dashboard", but personally I like the change. It still sounds like Modest Mouse, just kicked up a notch.