Moody

moody

Lake Michigan- Original Signed Fine Art Photograph by kimberlyblok on Etsy

Lake Michigan- Original Signed Fine Art Photograph by kimberlyblok on Etsy

Love the color and moody vintage feel.

  • Moody Little Moon Case for iPhone 5/4 Samsung Galaxy S2/S3/S4 Blackberry Q/Z - PDA Accessories on Ownza

    Tags: electronics
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  • Large Lips Tongue Stache by Moody Pet | Fab.com on Ownza

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  • BLK JKS (pronounced "black jacks"), The Rolling Stone Magazine said "... After Robots incorporates everything from sunny South African kwaito to art-rock shredding; the result has been compared to Sonic Youth and TV on the Radio..... BLK JKS (pronounced "black jacks"), The Rolling Stone Magazine said "... After Robots incorporates everything from sunny South African kwaito to art-rock shredding; the result has been compared to Sonic Youth and TV on the Radio..." "Kwa Nqingetje" was the track that caught my ear, featuring vocals that reminded me of Justin Hayward of The Moody Blues over a loose waltzing ballad punctuated by Jazz drumming. I will keep a ear out for Blk Jks, I'd like how they evolve.

  • At only 50$ a piece, you can own a cool piece of art that lights up! Once again, form+function at its finest! At this price, you could get a few of them!

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  • By Even Design of Italy (who, I believe has gone out of business), comes this $15,000.00 free standing tub that has a built in aquarium. Part of their Moody collection which includes the vanity and toilet I posted on here years ag... By Even Design of Italy (who, I believe has gone out of business), comes this $15,000.00 free standing tub that has a built in aquarium. Part of their Moody collection which includes the vanity and toilet I posted on here years ago. If you can afford it, it's available here for purchase (but I don't think they'll ship to the US).

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  • Uhm, leggings with persona depending on how much leg you are privileged enough to see? I think yes, full throttle. Study up on your espanol, puntas! These are not only en vogue, but in the midstay of obnoxious over print meets Ame... Uhm, leggings with persona depending on how much leg you are privileged enough to see? I think yes, full throttle. Study up on your espanol, puntas! These are not only en vogue, but in the midstay of obnoxious over print meets American Apparell. Happy Medium, habla espanol. What more could one ask for in the case of one of a kind leggings? From the bottom up (en español): Demure Discreet Subtle Flirtatious Sensual Moody Seductive Provocative Bold Shameless Warrior Fatal

  • This brass based table lamp is very slick and almost exudes a powerful sensibility. I see it in a Mad Men style office, or moody bedroom.

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  • The three-year stretch between Gimme Fiction and Spoon's previous album, Kill the Moonlight, was the longest gap between the band's releases since the end of its disastrous relationship with Elektra Records helped put two and a ha... The three-year stretch between Gimme Fiction and Spoon's previous album, Kill the Moonlight, was the longest gap between the band's releases since the end of its disastrous relationship with Elektra Records helped put two and a half years between A Series of Sneaks and Girls Can Tell. Though the circumstances behind this hiatus probably weren't as dire as those behind the band's previous one, the anticipation surrounding Gimme Fiction was nearly as high as it was for Girls Can Tell, and Gimme Fiction feels like as much of a refinement on what came before it as Girls Can Tell did at the time. A dark, theatrical album seething with late-night tension and menace, Gimme Fiction is a bigger-sounding affair than Spoon's previous work, with lots of keyboards, guitars, and strings parts courtesy of the Tosca Strings. But, even with the album's bigger scope, the band keeps its eye for detail. Everything about Gimme Fiction, from its artwork -- which looks like photographer Irving Penn doing a surreal fashion spread on Little Red Riding Hood for Vogue Magazine circa the 1950s -- to the little sound effects that embellish each song, is meticulous. Fortunately, "meticulous" doesn't spill over into "careful" or "precious"; the album's first three tracks show that Spoon makes music that's intricate and rousing at the same time. "The Beast and Dragon, Adored" acts as a slow-building preface and statement of intent, mentioning later song titles and introducing Gimme Fiction's big, brooding sound. "The Two Sides of Monsieur Valentine," a string-driven tale of a mysterious gentleman/cad, boasts some of Britt Daniel's cleverest storytelling, while "I Turn My Camera On" turns voyeurism and emotional distance into a subtly irresistible groove that sounds like a tense rewrite of the Stones' "Emotional Rescue" (later on, the intro of "They Never Got You" sounds strangely like Hall & Oates' "Maneater" -- it's nice to hear them reach back to '70s and '80s references that aren't the post-punk and new wave influences borrowed by so many other indie rock bands, or even the Elvis Costello nods that shaped so much of Spoon's earlier work). Gimme Fiction's opening trio of songs is so strong that it tends to overpower the rest of the album at first, but other standouts eventually bubble to the surface: "My Mathematical Mind" is one long verse, broken up by instrumental interludes where choruses would normally go; it keeps building and building, and though it's not an immediate song, it is a hypnotic one. On the other hand, the relatively lighthearted "Sister Jack" and pretty but oddly jittery acoustic ballad "I Summon You" just emphasize how moody and nocturnal the rest of the album is. Indeed, taut, restrained tracks like "The Delicate Place," "The Infinite Pet," and "Merchants of Soul" seem to be more about supporting Gimme Fiction's nocturnal mood than standing out as great songs. Still the interesting productions and arrangements on songs like these and "Was It You?" make them enjoyable in their own right. "Meticulous," "distant," and "restrained" may not be the most likely adjectives to describe a good rock record, but they fit Gimme Fiction perfectly. With this album, Spoon continues to build one of the most consistent, and distinctive, bodies of work in indie rock -- the band makes changes and takes chances from album to album, but ends up sounding exactly how Spoon should sound each time. [Gimme Fiction was also released with a disc of bonus tracks that included the previously unreleased songs "Carryout Kids" and "You Was It," as well as demos of "I Summon You" and "Sister Jack."] ~ Heather Phares, All Music Guide « less… more »

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  • Jimmy Eat World were sitting on top of the emo pop world before the release of their last album, Futures. Its dark, inward-looking, and more mature-sounding songs didn't wreck their career, but the record didn't exactly further it... Jimmy Eat World were sitting on top of the emo pop world before the release of their last album, Futures. Its dark, inward-looking, and more mature-sounding songs didn't wreck their career, but the record didn't exactly further it. With Chase This Light, the band returns to the straightforward, hooky, and radio-friendly sound of Bleed American and lightens up some in the lyric department in hopes of recapturing its position in the marketplace. They aren't exactly singing about sunshine and lollipops, mostly love problems and the ills of society, but the cloud of gloom that settled over Futures has lifted. The band is back to following the rough template of Bleed American and the albums that came before it, with a mix of rousing anthems like "Big Casino," "Electable (Give It Up)," and "Feeling Lucky," melancholy rockers with singalong choruses like "Always Be" and "Chase This Light," and sweet ballads like "Carry You" and "Dizzy" (which strangely sounds like an outtake from Def Leppard's Hysteria). Only the moody and dark (with strings) "Gotta Be Somebody's Blues" hints at the mature sound of the last album. Try as they might, Chase This Light isn't as good as Bleed American, Still, it's a pleasant listen and Jim Adkins has a solid knack for writing hooky modern pop songs. ~ Tim Sendra, All Music Guide « less… more »

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  • Beginning with "Caring Is Creepy," which opens this album with a psychedelic flourish that would not be out of place on a late-1960s Moody Blues, Beach Boys, or Love release, the Shins present a collection of retro pop nuggets tha... Beginning with "Caring Is Creepy," which opens this album with a psychedelic flourish that would not be out of place on a late-1960s Moody Blues, Beach Boys, or Love release, the Shins present a collection of retro pop nuggets that distill the finer aspects of classic acid rock with surrealistic lyrics, independently melodic basslines, jangly guitars, echo laden vocals, minimalist keyboard motifs, and a myriad of cosmic sound effects. With only two of the cuts clocking in at over four minutes, Oh Inverted World avoids the penchant for self-indulgence that befalls most outfits who worship at the altar of Syd Barrett, Skip Spence, and Arthur Lee. Lead singer James Mercer's lazy, hazy phrasing and vocal timbre, which often echoes a young Brian Wilson, drifts in and out of the subtle tempo changes of "Know Your Onion," the jagged rhythm in "Girl Inform Me," the Donovan-esque folksy veneer of "New Slang," and the Warhol's Factory aura of "Your Algebra," all of which illustrate this New Mexico-based quartet's adept knowledge of the progressive/art rock genre which they so lovingly pay homage to. Though the production and mix are somewhat polished when compared to the memorable recordings of Moby Grape and early-Pink Floyd, the Shins capture the spirit of '67 with stunning accuracy. ~ Tom Semioli, All Music Guide « less… more »

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  • This colorful set of egg inspired decoration lights will pimp up your Easter party using light-emitting diodes and the power from the USB post on your computer. Features: 8 LED lights Built in 12 color changing LED Moo... This colorful set of egg inspired decoration lights will pimp up your Easter party using light-emitting diodes and the power from the USB post on your computer. Features: 8 LED lights Built in 12 color changing LED Moody light effect Compatible with any Windows and Macintosh platforms Plug and play Powered by USB port and No batteries are required Driver free Length: 267cm

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  • There's good reason for Tim McGraw's endurance at the top of contemporary country: he's a restless visionary who's worked hard to improve as an interpretive singer. In 2002, McGraw bucked the trend and convinced his label, and pro... There's good reason for Tim McGraw's endurance at the top of contemporary country: he's a restless visionary who's worked hard to improve as an interpretive singer. In 2002, McGraw bucked the trend and convinced his label, and producers Byron Gallimore and Darran Smith, to let him use his road band in the studio. The rough and tumble intimacy of the set put it over the top and appealed to music fans outside his circle. On Live Like You Were Dying, McGraw ups the ante. Using the same production team and his Dancehall Doctors, McGraw cut a whopping 16 tracks and helped in the mixing of the record, as well as co-producing. The song selection runs the gamut. There's the blues-rock energy of the opener, "How Bad Do You Want It," where he evokes the ghost of the Mississippi Delta as well as the hard country-rock sounds of Marshall Tucker and Lynyrd Skynyrd. Then there's the shimmering Americana of "My Old Friend" that would not be out of place performed by Pierce Pettis, and the fantastic "Old Town New," by renegade songwriters Bruce Robison and Darrell Scott. The monster single from this record, "Live Like You Were Dying," by Craig Wiseman and Tim Nichols, is the very best kind of modern country song; the emotion in McGraw's delivery is honest, not saccharine. In anyone else's voice, a song like "Drugs or Jesus" would be just plain bad. The tune itself is solid and beautifully constructed, a perfect marriage of melody, hook, and direct, simple lyrics. But the temptation to overperform such a song is irresistible to most of the hit factory's mainstays. Not for McGraw though: his understatement underscores the lyric's seriousness. The tenderness in Rodney Crowell and James T. Slater's "Open Season on My Heart" is vulnerable in all the right ways. The moody poignancy of "Walk Like a Man," is a fine and haunting centerpiece for this fine album. "Kill Myself" has to be experienced -- it's a miracle and a testament to McGraw's clout that this tune made it on to the record. "We Carry On" is a soulful anthem, gritty, true, and beautiful. It's a fitting close to McGraw's finest moment yet. The young hell-raiser has grown to be one of modern country's most compelling and multidimensional artists. ~ Thom Jurek, All Music Guide « less… more »

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  • This is a short series of dresses which I'm calling "l'Orientale", as it was designed around this wonderful out of print fabric by Romo that I happened across, that features motifs and scenes with a Victorian 'chinoiserie' feel. ... This is a short series of dresses which I'm calling "l'Orientale", as it was designed around this wonderful out of print fabric by Romo that I happened across, that features motifs and scenes with a Victorian 'chinoiserie' feel. The dress has angled pleats over the bust, widely-set shoulder straps featuring vintage buttons, and a flirty, drop waisted skirt made from two layers of pure linen. Undarted through the body, a little matching tie brings it in to the waist. A super comfy yet elegant and striking dress, that always draws compliments each and every time I wear it! The colours are strong, and moody - rich lacquer blue, congealed blood, cranberry, powder blue... There will only be one dress in each colour-way so each buyer will truly have a one-off dress! This listing is for a custom-sized dress, with the cranberry-coloured bodice as seen in the pics (you will not receive the ready-made dress, as that one is mine), made just for you. If you'd like it in one of the other colours, please see my other listings. Measurements I will need: - bust - overbust - waist - hip - preferred length from shoulder to hem - height in feet and inches This dress is hand-washable, and irons up a treat! Thanks for looking, please convo with questions!

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  • During 1969 and 1970, CCR was dismissed by hipsters as a bubblegum pop band and the sniping had grown intolerable, at least to John Fogerty, who designed Pendulum as a rebuke to critics. He spent time polishing the production, bri... During 1969 and 1970, CCR was dismissed by hipsters as a bubblegum pop band and the sniping had grown intolerable, at least to John Fogerty, who designed Pendulum as a rebuke to critics. He spent time polishing the production, bringing in keyboards, horns, even a vocal choir. His songs became self-consciously serious and tighter, working with the aesthetic of the rock underground -- Pendulum was constructed as a proper album, contrasting dramatically with CCR's previous records, all throwbacks to joyous early rock records where covers sat nicely next to hits and overlooked gems tucked away at the end of the second side. To some fans of classic CCR, this approach may feel a little odd since only "Have You Ever Seen the Rain" and maybe its B-side "Hey Tonight" sound undeniably like prime Creedence. But, given time, the album is a real grower, revealing many overlooked Fogerty gems. Yes, it isn't transcendent like the albums they made from Bayou Country through Cosmo's Factory, but most bands never even come close to that kind of hot streak. Instead, Pendulum finds a first-class songwriter and craftsman pushing himself and his band to try new sounds, styles, and textures. His ambition results in a stumble -- "Rude Awakening 2" portentously teeters on the verge of prog-rock, something CCR just can't pull off -- but the rest of the record is excellent, with such great numbers as the bluesy groove "Pagan Baby," the soulful vamp "Chameleon," the moody "It's Just a Thought," and the raver "Molina." Most bands would kill for this to be their best stuff, and the fact that it's tucked away on an album that even some fans forget illustrates what a tremendous band Creedence Clearwater Revival was. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine, All Music Guide « less… more »

  • Ever since the big, splashy Gold failed to make Ryan Adams an all-conquering superstar -- it bolstered his reputation as a rock critic darling, but never had the sales to match the press -- he's retreated to genre exercises, begin... Ever since the big, splashy Gold failed to make Ryan Adams an all-conquering superstar -- it bolstered his reputation as a rock critic darling, but never had the sales to match the press -- he's retreated to genre exercises, beginning with the sleek modern rock of 2003's Rock N Roll and its moody alt rock counterpart, Love Is Hell, carrying through to his Neil Young/Grateful Dead pastiche on his spring 2005 double-album Cold Roses, and now its autumn sequel, Jacksonville City Nights. Arriving a little over four months after Cold Roses as the second installment of a planned trilogy of 2005 releases, Jacksonville City Nights -- which at one point was going to be called the less-evocative but calendar-specific September -- is Adams' straight-up, straight-ahead country album, a lean 46-minute collection of 14 songs designed for late-night drinking. While the terrific cover art deliberately echoes classic '60s country LPs, the sound of the album isn't quite as honky tonk as that suggests, thanks to a handful of brooding numbers like "September" that are too introspective, lyric-centered, and light on melody to truly qualify as classicist country. These are the weakest moments here, but they're also the exception to the rule, since most of the songs represent a number of classic country archetypes, from the opening pair of barroom anthems, "A Kiss Before I Go" and "The End," to his "Dear John" duet with Norah Jones or the light hillbilly swagger of the galloping "Trains" and how "My Heart Is Broken" is sweetened by just enough swings to give it a candy coating but not enough to turn it into countrypolitan schmaltz. As good as these cuts sound, it's still hard not to shake the suspicion that Ryan Adams is primarily a pastiche artist, since it's not only easy to spot influences throughout the album, but because the atmosphere of the record makes more of an impression than the individual songs. That said, Jacksonville City Nights still ranks as one of Adams' stronger albums, not just because he's returning to his rootsy roots -- after all, this isn't alt country, this is pure country -- but because it maintains a consistent mood, is tightly edited and well sequenced, and thanks to the Cardinals, has the easy assurance of Cold Roses, which is preferable to the somewhat desperate feel of the records immediately following Heartbreaker. It may not all add up to a major statement, which is something Gold and Rock N Roll aspired to be, but it surely makes for a more likeable and ultimately more listenable album. [This edition contains one bonus track.] ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine, All Music Guide « less… more »

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  • Ever since the big, splashy Gold failed to make Ryan Adams an all-conquering superstar -- it bolstered his reputation as a rock critic darling, but never had the sales to match the press -- he's retreated to genre exercises, begin... Ever since the big, splashy Gold failed to make Ryan Adams an all-conquering superstar -- it bolstered his reputation as a rock critic darling, but never had the sales to match the press -- he's retreated to genre exercises, beginning with the sleek modern rock of 2003's Rock N Roll and its moody alt-rock counterpart, Love Is Hell, carrying through to his Neil Young/Grateful Dead pastiche on his spring 2005 double album, Cold Roses, and now its autumn sequel, Jacksonville City Nights. Arriving a little over four months after Cold Roses as the second installment of a planned trilogy of 2005 releases, Jacksonville City Nights -- which at one point was going to be called the less-evocative but calendar-specific September -- is Adams' straight-up, straight-ahead country album, a lean 46-minute collection of 14 songs designed for late-night drinking. While the terrific cover art deliberately echoes classic '60s country LPs, the sound of the album isn't quite as honky tonk as that suggests, thanks to a handful of brooding numbers like "September" that are too introspective, lyric-centered, and light on melody to truly qualify as classicist country. These are the weakest moments here, but they're also the exception to the rule, since most of the songs here represent a number of classic country archetypes, from the opening pair of barroom anthems, "A Kiss Before I Go" and "The End," to his "Dear John" duet with Norah Jones or the light hillbilly swagger of the galloping "Trains" and how "My Heart Is Broken" is sweetened by just enough swings to give it a candy coating but not enough to turn it into countrypolitan schmaltz. As good as these cuts sound, it's still hard not to shake the suspicion that Ryan Adams is primarily a pastiche artist, since it's not only easy to spot influences throughout the album, but because the atmosphere of the record makes more of an impression than the individual songs. That said, Jacksonville City Nights still ranks as one of Adams' stronger albums, not just because he's returning to his rootsy roots -- after all, this isn't alt-country, this is pure country -- but because it maintains a consistent mood, is tightly edited and well sequenced, and thanks to the Cardinals, has the easy assurance of Cold Roses, which is preferable to the somewhat desperate feel of the records immediately following Heartbreaker. It may not all add up to a major statement, which is something Gold and Rock N Roll aspired to be, but it surely makes for a more likeable and ultimately more listenable album. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine, All Music Guide « less… more »

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  • One would think that being Ryan Adams would be a pretty good deal at the time of this album's release; he had a major-label deal, critics were in love with him, he got to date Winona Ryder and Alanis Morissette, Elton John went ar... One would think that being Ryan Adams would be a pretty good deal at the time of this album's release; he had a major-label deal, critics were in love with him, he got to date Winona Ryder and Alanis Morissette, Elton John went around telling everyone he was a genius, and his record company gave him carte blanche to do whatever he wanted. But to listen to Gold, Adams' first solo album for his big-league sponsors at Lost Highway, one senses that there are about a dozen other musicians Adams would love to be, and nearly all of them were at their peak in the early to mid-'70s. Adams' final album with Whiskeytown, Pneumonia, made it clear that he was moving beyond the scruffy alt-country of his early work, and Gold documents his current fascination with '70s rock. Half the fun of the album is playing "Spot the Influence": "Answering Bell" is a dead ringer for Van Morrison (with fellow Morrison enthusiast Adam Duritz on backing vocals), "Tina Toledo's Street Walkin' Blues" is obviously modeled on the Rolling Stones, "Harder Now That It's Over" sounds like Harvest-period Neil Young, "New York, New York" resembles Stephen Stills in his livelier moments (Stephen's son, Chris Stills, plays on the album), and "Rescue Blues" and "La Cienega Just Smiled" suggest the influence of Adams' pal Elton John. Of course, everyone has their influences, and Adams seems determined to make the most of them on Gold; it's a far more ambitious album than his solo debut, Heartbreaker. The performances are polished, Ethan Johns' production is at once elegant and admirably restrained, Adams is in strong voice throughout, and several of the songs are superb, especially the swaggering but lovelorn "New York, New York," the spare and lovely "When the Stars Go Blue," and the moody closer, "Goodnight, Hollywood Blvd." But while Gold sounds like a major step forward for Adams in terms of technique, it lacks the heart and soul of Heartbreaker or Pneumonia; the album seems to reflect craft rather than passion, and while it's often splendid craft, the fire that made Whiskeytown's best work so special isn't evident much of the time. Gold sounds like an album that could win Ryan Adams a lot of new fans (especially with listeners whose record collections go back a ways), but longtime fans may be a bit put off by the album's richly crafted surfaces and emotionally hollow core. ~ Mark Deming, All Music Guide « less… more »

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  • Dark and moody and a block that can state my sometimes state of mind. Not really a necklace for a gift, but something for yourself.

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  • What's better than food with personality?

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  • Helmut Lang is well know for his unique way with shapes and utilizing simplicity in such an amazing way. I love when he makes cute vegan friendly boy clothes because it kind of calms the rage I feel towards the fact 95% of th... Helmut Lang is well know for his unique way with shapes and utilizing simplicity in such an amazing way. I love when he makes cute vegan friendly boy clothes because it kind of calms the rage I feel towards the fact 95% of the rest of his clothing is not. I really like the shape of this tee, and the moody color

  • Modest Mouse's Epic debut, The Moon & Antarctica, finds them strangely subdued, focusing on mortality as well as the moody, acoustic side of their music and downplaying the edgy, spastic rock that helped make them indie stars. Not... Modest Mouse's Epic debut, The Moon & Antarctica, finds them strangely subdued, focusing on mortality as well as the moody, acoustic side of their music and downplaying the edgy, spastic rock that helped make them indie stars. Not that their first major-label release sounds like a sellout -- actually, the slight sheen of Brian Deck's production enhances the album's introspective tone -- but occasionally The Moon & Antarctica's melancholy becomes ponderous. Unfortunately, the album's middle stretch contains three such songs, "The Cold Part," "Alone Down There," and "The Stars Are… more »

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  • Modest Mouse's Epic debut, The Moon & Antarctica, finds them strangely subdued, focusing on mortality as well as the moody, acoustic side of their music and downplaying the edgy, spastic rock that helped make them indie stars. Not... Modest Mouse's Epic debut, The Moon & Antarctica, finds them strangely subdued, focusing on mortality as well as the moody, acoustic side of their music and downplaying the edgy, spastic rock that helped make them indie stars. Not that their first major-label release sounds like a sellout -- actually, the slight sheen of Brian Deck's production enhances the album's introspective tone -- but occasionally The Moon & Antarctica's melancholy becomes ponderous. Unfortunately, the album's middle stretch contains three such songs, "The Cold Part," "Alone Down There," and "The Stars Are… more »

  • ohhh Spooky. You can be an auror (the smartest profession in the wizarding world) with this eye.

  • You're not the only one allowed to be moody in the morning...jeeezzzz!

  • I love those feather weight mousseline clouds of this layered, creative blouse. The moody greys of the November sky accentuate the hippy sophistication of the blouse, providing aperfect background for the multicolored print on the... I love those feather weight mousseline clouds of this layered, creative blouse. The moody greys of the November sky accentuate the hippy sophistication of the blouse, providing aperfect background for the multicolored print on the front layer. Skinny leans or the sigarette pants are the perfect pairing.

  • Tags: pillows, toasts
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  • I could stare at this painting for hours. The dimension is wonderful! What do you see when you look at it? I love looking at abstracts trying to see as many things as possible. In this painting I see a pelican!

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  • Gorgeous photo, very moody..would enhance a very personal space.

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