Beatles Stella McCartney Red Nose Day 09 T-shirt

Beatles Stella McCartney Red Nose Day 09 T-shirt

Created by Stella McCartney for Red Nose Day, this shirt might stand as my favorite charity shirt, ever.

  • As fanciful as the costumes Stella McCartney created for the NYCB production "Ocean's Kingdom," this Caribbean blue maxi dress wows on both sea and shore.

  • Everyone remembers the first time they heard the Beatles. Whether it was on the Ed Sullivan Show back in the 1960’s or in your parent’s car 30 years later, the Fab Four continue to leave an indelible print on listeners both old an... Everyone remembers the first time they heard the Beatles. Whether it was on the Ed Sullivan Show back in the 1960’s or in your parent’s car 30 years later, the Fab Four continue to leave an indelible print on listeners both old and new. That’s why the new release, Fab Fan Memories – The Beatles Bond from WannaBeats Records makes our top-ten this month. This Spoken Word album is hosted by George Harrison’s sister Louise Harrison and features interviews with Beatles fans from across the globe including special guests such as Janis Ian, Melissa Manchester, Alan Menken and Wesley Orbison. Produced by two-time Grammy and Emmy award winner Dennis Scott, the memories and stories shared on this album are both hearfelt, funny, and totally fab. It’s release is also concurrent with Martin Scorsese's HBO Documentary 'George Harrison: Living In The Material World'. 2012 will be the 50th anniversary of the formation of The Beatles and FAB FAN MEMORIES - THE BEATLES BOND is a treat for the true Beatles fan. Combined with unforgettable interviews and Beatles inspired music, this unique recording belongs in everyone’s library. Click the “ThisNext” button to download this album in MP3 form or, for an album that actually spins, you can get a good ol' hard copy on CD from amazon by copying and pasting this link: http://amzn.to/rS8zHC

  • Everyone remembers the first time the heard the Beatles. Whether it was on the Ed Sullivan Show back in the 1960’s or in your parent’s car 30 years later, the Fab Four continue to leave an indelible print on listeners both old and... Everyone remembers the first time the heard the Beatles. Whether it was on the Ed Sullivan Show back in the 1960’s or in your parent’s car 30 years later, the Fab Four continue to leave an indelible print on listeners both old and new. That’s why the new release, Fab Fan Memories – The Beatles Bond from WannaBeats Records makes our top-ten this month. This Spoken Word album is hosted by George Harrison’s sister Louise Harrison and features interviews with Beatles fans from across the globe including special guests such as Janis Ian, Melissa Manchester, Alan Menken and Wesley Orbison. Produced by two-time Grammy and Emmy award winner Dennis Scott, the memories and stories shared on this album are both hearfelt, funny, and totally fab. It’s release is also concurrent with Martin Scorsese's HBO Documentary 'George Harrison: Living In The Material World'. All things considered, one can’t deny that Fab Fan Memories – The Beatles Bond is a real treat for the true Beatles fan and a slection that belongs in everyone’s library. Click the thisnext button to download this album from iTunes, or you can get a good ole hard copy on CD from amazon by copying and pasting this link: http://amzn.to/rS8zHC

  • You know how it is when you find something strange and unique that oddly none of your friends or family knows of, and the thing you've discovered is so strange and quirky that you're too embarrassed to ask anyone about it, and as ... You know how it is when you find something strange and unique that oddly none of your friends or family knows of, and the thing you've discovered is so strange and quirky that you're too embarrassed to ask anyone about it, and as the years pass you wonder if the whole thing was just a dream—then one day you find that thing again—you finally have proof that you're not crazy after all, but quickly you feel uncomfortable because the this thing that you found is too embarrassing to talk about? Well, this is how I feel about the album cover for Paul McCartney's "Paul Is Live".

  • Normally I would only recommend one album at a time, but in this case I know every album is a masterpiece. The albums have been remastered at EMI's Abbey Road Studios in London, resulting in the highest fidelity the catalogue h... Normally I would only recommend one album at a time, but in this case I know every album is a masterpiece. The albums have been remastered at EMI's Abbey Road Studios in London, resulting in the highest fidelity the catalogue has seen since its original release. Each of the CDs are packaged with replicated UK album art, expanded booklets with original and newly written liner notes, and rare photos. For a limited period, each CD will also be embedded with a brief documentary film about the album.

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  • The ladies hang with their boys, John, Paul, Ringo and George. Great photo-booth portraiture over Union Jack Graphic.

  • Turns out that Sir Paul McCartney has created an album that has the edge that I've always wanted him to reveal more of. "Electric Arguments" is that album. The first track "Nothing Too Much Just Out Of Sight" is my favorite off th... Turns out that Sir Paul McCartney has created an album that has the edge that I've always wanted him to reveal more of. "Electric Arguments" is that album. The first track "Nothing Too Much Just Out Of Sight" is my favorite off the album, it's the grittiest song I can recall him record since "Helter Skelter", I'd love to see McCartney make even harder edge work. I hate to say it cause it dilutes the work that he has done, but I this The Fireman is the closets he's come to making a contemporary Beatles album, ok, I said it.

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  • Apple Records We've missed you!

  • My pregnant belly has been craving all things from early childhood...music included. This was one of my first vinyl albums and is arguably one of the best albums of all time. Plus, it has "Human Nature" which is one of my favor... My pregnant belly has been craving all things from early childhood...music included. This was one of my first vinyl albums and is arguably one of the best albums of all time. Plus, it has "Human Nature" which is one of my favorite MJ songs of all time (written by by Steve Porcaro of the band Toto and John Bettis).

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  • the beatles don't need much explanation. you're most likely familiar with their music and if not, damn, i dunno what to say! this album is super special. the tracks have been remastered and seamlessly move about until suddenly the... the beatles don't need much explanation. you're most likely familiar with their music and if not, damn, i dunno what to say! this album is super special. the tracks have been remastered and seamlessly move about until suddenly the albums over before you know it. you will be pressing play again!

  • Allusion to the digital world though it may be, there's a sweet, elegiac undercurrent to the title of Paul McCartney's Memory Almost Full, an acknowledgement that it was written and recorded when McCartney was 64, the age he mytho... Allusion to the digital world though it may be, there's a sweet, elegiac undercurrent to the title of Paul McCartney's Memory Almost Full, an acknowledgement that it was written and recorded when McCartney was 64, the age he mythologized on Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, released almost exactly 40 years before Memory. Certainly, McCartney has mortality on the mind, but this isn't an entirely unusual occurrence for him in this third act of his solo career. Ever since his wife Linda's death from cancer in 1998, he's been dancing around the subject, peppering Flaming Pie with longing looks back, grieving by throwing himself into the past on the covers album Run Devil Run, slowly coming to terms with his status as the old guard on the carefully ruminative Chaos and Creation in the Backyard. But if that previous record was precise, bearing all the hallmarks of meticulous producer Nigel Godrich, Memory Almost Full is startlingly bright and frequently lively, an album that embraces McCartney's unerring gift for melody. Yet for as pop as it is, this is not an album made with any illusion that Paul will soon have a succession of hit singles: it's an art-pop album, not unlike either of the McCartney albums. Sometimes this is reflected in the construction --- the quick succession of short songs at the end, uncannily (and quite deliberately) sounding like a suite -- sometimes in the lyrics, but the remarkable thing is that McCartney never sounds self-consciously pretentious here, as if he's striving to make a major statement. Rather, he's quietly taking stock of his life and loves, his work and achievements. Unlike latter-day efforts by Johnny Cash or the murky Daniel Lanois-produced albums by Bob Dylan, mortality haunts the album, but there's no fetishization of death. Instead, McCartney marvels at his life -- explicitly so in the disarmingly guileless "That Was Me," where he enthuses about his role in a stage play in grammar school with the same vigor as he boasts about playing the Cavern Club with the Beatles -- and realizes that when he reaches "The End of the End," he doesn't want anything more than the fond old stories of his life to be told. This matter-of-fact acknowledgement that he's in the last act of his life hangs over this album, but his penchant for nostalgia -- this is the man who wrote the sepia-toned music hall shuffle "Your Mother Should Know" before he was 30, after all -- has lost its rose-tinted streak. Where he once romanticized days gone by, McCartney now admits that we're merely living with "The Ever Present Past," just like how although we live in the present, we still wear "Vintage Clothes." He's no longer pining for the past, since he knows where the present is heading, yet he seems disarmingly grateful for where his journey has taken him and what it has meant for him, to the extent that he slings no arrows at his second wife, Heather Mills, he only offers her "Gratitude." Given the nastiness of the coverage of his recent divorce, Paul might be spinning his eternal optimism a bit hard on this song, but it isn't forced or saccharine -- it fits alongside the clear-eyed sentiment of the rest of Memory Almost Full. It rings true to the open-heartedness of his music, and the album delivers some of McCartney's best latter-day music. Memory Almost Full is so melodic and memorable, it's easy to take for granted his skill as a craftsman, particularly here when it feels so natural and unforced, even when it takes left turns, which it thankfully does more than once. Best of all, this is the rare pop meditation on mortality that doesn't present itself as a major statement, yet it is thematically and musically coherent, slowly working its way under your skin and lodging its way into your cluttered memory. On the surface, it's bright and accessible, as easy to enjoy as the best of Paul's solo albums, but it lingers in the heart and mind in a way uncommon to the rest of his work, and to many other latter-day albums from his peers as well. [The deluxe edition of Memory Almost Full contains a live DVD, extra packaging, and bonus tracks, including an interview with McCartney about the album, plus three new songs: the pleasant-enough instrumental "In Private," the quite good, mildly brooding pop tune "Why So Blue," and the amiably ambling throwaway instrumental "222."] ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine, All Music Guide « less… more »

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  • Quiet though it may be, Paul McCartney experienced something of a late-career renaissance with the release of his 1997 album Flaming Pie. With that record, he shook off years of coyness and half-baked ideas and delivered an album ... Quiet though it may be, Paul McCartney experienced something of a late-career renaissance with the release of his 1997 album Flaming Pie. With that record, he shook off years of coyness and half-baked ideas and delivered an album that, for whatever its slight flaws, was both ambitious and cohesive, and it started a streak that continued through the driving rock & roll album Run Devil Run and its 2001 follow-up, Driving Rain. For Chaos and Creation in the Backyard, the follow-up to that record, McCartney tried a different tactic, returning to the one-man band aesthetic of his debut album, McCartney, its latter-day sequel, McCartney II, and, to a lesser extent, the home-spun second album, Ram. Apart from a guitar part or two, a couple of drum tracks, and, of course, the strings and horns that pop up now and again, McCartney played everything here, from the guitars and keyboards down to the bass and drums. The difference here is that instead of producing the record by himself, McCartney brought in alt-rock auteur Nigel Godrich, best known as the producer behind Radiohead's OK Computer and Beck's Mutations, as well as being the only producer responsible for a streamlined Pavement record. Godrich has a gift for making messy or difficult music sound simple, logical, and clean, and he has that same effect on Chaos and Creation, removing the obvious rough edges and home-spun charm that characterized Macca's previous one-man affairs. Consequently, Chaos sounds as polished as a normal McCartney album, as polished as Driving Rain, but the process of its creation and recording does make this a very different album from not just its predecessor, but from most of McCartney's solo albums. It's quiet and meditative, not without its share of eccentricities, nor without its share of sprightly tunes -- certainly, the opener, "Fine Line," is a propulsive, hooky song that burrows into your head after just one spin and sounds like a tune you've known all your life, and "Promise to You Girl" also zips along nicely -- but the overall feel of the record is one that's reflective and ruminative, not messy or silly. Or whimsical or treacly, for that matter, since the combination of introspective ballads and intricately detailed but not overly fussy or polished production means that Chaos and Creation in the Backyard is a rare thing indeed: a McCartney album that's devoid of cuteness or easy sentiment. Which doesn't mean that it's somber or lacking in romantic material -- Paul loves his love songs, after all -- but the tone and timbre of the album is so simple, stripped-down, and sincere that all the music resonates a little deeper and feels a little more heartfelt. If there are no outright knockouts here, there are no weak spots, either, and if the album doesn't have the sprawl and quirks or overt humor of his classic solo albums from Ram through Tug of War, that's OK, because Chaos and Creation in the Backyard offers something different: not only is Paul in an unusually reflective mode, but he's made a lean, cohesive record that holds together better than his previous latter-day high-water mark, Flaming Pie -- which is unusual, since McCartney albums rarely, if ever, come without spots of filler. The quiet nature of Chaos and Creation may mean that some listeners will pass it over quickly, since it's a grower, but spend some time with the record and it becomes clear that McCartney is far from spent as either a songwriter or record-maker and, in many ways, continues to make some of the best music of his solo career. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine, All Music Guide « less… more »

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  • Love in Song, Band on the Run, My Brave Face, Come and Get It, Jet, Girls' School, Hi, Hi, Hi, Letting Go, Venus and Mars/Rock Show, Another Day, Name and Address, Every Night, Helen Wheels, Temporary Secretary, Let Me Roll It, Ju... Love in Song, Band on the Run, My Brave Face, Come and Get It, Jet, Girls' School, Hi, Hi, Hi, Letting Go, Venus and Mars/Rock Show, Another Day, Name and Address, Every Night, Helen Wheels, Temporary Secretary, Let Me Roll It, Junior's Farm, Cook of the House, Mumbo, My Love, Singalong Junk

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  • Reuniting with producer George Martin was a bit of a masterstroke on the part of Paul McCartney, since it guaranteed that Tug of War would receive a large, attentive audience. Martin does help McCartney focus, but it's hard to giv... Reuniting with producer George Martin was a bit of a masterstroke on the part of Paul McCartney, since it guaranteed that Tug of War would receive a large, attentive audience. Martin does help McCartney focus, but it's hard to give all the credit to Tug of War, since McCartney was showing signs of creative rebirth on McCartney II, a homemade collection of synth-based tunes. This lush, ambitious, sprawling album couldn't be further from that record. That was deliberately experimental and intimate, while this is nothing less than a grand gesture, playing as McCartney's attempt to summarize everything he can do on one record. There's majestic balladry, folky guitars, unabashed whimsy, unashamed sentimentality, clever jokes, silliness, hints of reggae, a rockabilly duet with Carl Perkins, two collaborations with Stevie Wonder, and, of course, lots of great tunes. If anything, McCartney's trying a bit too hard here, and there are times that the music sags with its own ambition (or slightly dated production, as on the smash single "Ebony and Ivory"). But, at its best -- the surging title track, the giddy "Take It Away," the vaudevillian stomp "Ballroom Dancing," the Lennon tribute "Here Today," the wonderful "Wanderlust" -- it's as good as McCartney gets. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine, All Music Guide « less… more »

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  • Allusion to the digital world though it may be, there's a sweet, elegiac undercurrent to the title of Paul McCartney's Memory Almost Full, an acknowledgement that it was written and recorded when McCartney was 64, the age he mytho... Allusion to the digital world though it may be, there's a sweet, elegiac undercurrent to the title of Paul McCartney's Memory Almost Full, an acknowledgement that it was written and recorded when McCartney was 64, the age he mythologized on Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, released almost exactly 40 years before Memory. Certainly, McCartney has mortality on the mind, but this isn't an entirely unusual occurrence for him in this third act of his solo career. Ever since his wife Linda's death from cancer in 1998, he's been dancing around the subject, peppering Flaming Pie with longing looks back, grieving by throwing himself into the past on the covers album Run Devil Run, slowly coming to terms with his status as the old guard on the carefully ruminative Chaos and Creation in the Backyard. But if that previous record was precise, bearing all the hallmarks of meticulous producer Nigel Godrich, Memory Almost Full is startlingly bright and frequently lively, an album that embraces McCartney's unerring gift for melody. Yet for as pop as it is, this is not an album made with any illusion that Paul will soon have a succession of hit singles: it's an art-pop album, not unlike either of the McCartney albums. Sometimes this is reflected in the construction --- the quick succession of short songs at the end, uncannily (and quite deliberately) sounding like a suite -- sometimes in the lyrics, but the remarkable thing is that McCartney never sounds self-consciously pretentious here, as if he's striving to make a major statement. Rather, he's quietly taking stock of his life and loves, his work and achievements. Unlike latter-day efforts by Johnny Cash or the murky Daniel Lanois-produced albums by Bob Dylan, mortality haunts the album, but there's no fetishization of death. Instead, McCartney marvels at his life -- explicitly so in the disarmingly guileless "That Was Me," where he enthuses about his role in a stage play in grammar school with the same vigor as he boasts about playing the Cavern Club with the Beatles -- and realizes that when he reaches "The End of the End," he doesn't want anything more than the fond old stories of his life to be told. This matter-of-fact acknowledgement that he's in the last act of his life hangs over this album, but his penchant for nostalgia -- this is the man who wrote the sepia-toned music hall shuffle "Your Mother Should Know" before he was 30, after all -- has lost its rose-tinted streak. Where he once romanticized days gone by, McCartney now admits that we're merely living with "The Ever Present Past," just like how although we live in the present, we still wear "Vintage Clothes." He's no longer pining for the past, since he knows where the present is heading, yet he seems disarmingly grateful for where his journey has taken him and what it has meant for him, to the extent that he slings no arrows at his second wife, Heather Mills, he only offers her "Gratitude." Given the nastiness of the coverage of his recent divorce, Paul might be spinning his eternal optimism a bit hard on this song, but it isn't forced or saccharine -- it fits alongside the clear-eyed sentiment of the rest of Memory Almost Full. It rings true to the open-heartedness of his music, and the album delivers some of McCartney's best latter-day music. Memory Almost Full is so melodic and memorable, it's easy to take for granted his skill as a craftsman, particularly here when it feels so natural and unforced, even when it takes left turns, which it thankfully does more than once. Best of all, this is the rare pop meditation on mortality that doesn't present itself as a major statement, yet it is thematically and musically coherent, slowly working its way under your skin and lodging its way into your cluttered memory. On the surface, it's bright and accessible, as easy to enjoy as the best of Paul's solo albums, but it lingers in the heart and mind in a way uncommon to the rest of his work, and to many other latter-day albums from his peers as well. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine, All Music Guide « less… more »

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  • Covering the songs of Paul McCartney's solo career is a daunting task. Not only is there a certain stigma attached to the material (sometimes deservedly, sometimes not), but there's also the fact that McCartney's buoyant melodies ... Covering the songs of Paul McCartney's solo career is a daunting task. Not only is there a certain stigma attached to the material (sometimes deservedly, sometimes not), but there's also the fact that McCartney's buoyant melodies beg to be sung by a powerhouse vocalist; a band with a singer of average range risks masking the elegance of McCartney's best popcraft. In a way, then, it's surprising that Listen to What the Man Said works as well as it does. Modern rock acts sift through nearly two decades of Sir Paul's music, embracing hits and relative obscurities with equal frequency (though it's rather telling that the producers chose to include only two of McCartney's post-1980 numbers). Semisonic gets "Jet" exactly right, capturing all the fuzzy brilliance of the original, while Linus of Hollywood makes "Warm and Beautiful" one long, contented sigh of billowy harmony vocals ricocheting Brian Wilson style across the a cappella arrangement. Even better is Owsley's "Band on the Run," which remains vital while staying relentlessly faithful to McCartney's vision -- not an easy feat considering the jigsaw-like nature of the suite's various parts. To be sure, the disc isn't free of filler. Punk-pop outfit SR-71's take on "My Brave Face" is hopelessly stylized and feels bland and contrived as a result, the overblown psychedelia of the Minus 5's "Dear Friend" brings to mind McCartney's own excesses, and They Might Be Giants' instrumental reworking of "Ram On" ends up surprisingly devoid of life. Perhaps it says something about McCartney's skill as a pop arranger that the best covers here are those that don't experiment too much; either way, Listen to What the Man Said isn't going to go down as a timeless album, but it has enough moments of pop pleasure to be recommended to the more adventurous McCartney fans. ~ Kenneth Bays, All Music Guide « less… more »

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  • According to Paul McCartney, working on the Beatles Anthology project inspired him to record an album that was stripped-back, immediate, and fun, one less studied and produced than most of his recent work. In many ways, Flaming Pi... According to Paul McCartney, working on the Beatles Anthology project inspired him to record an album that was stripped-back, immediate, and fun, one less studied and produced than most of his recent work. In many ways, Flaming Pie fulfills those goals. A largely acoustic collection of simple songs, Flaming Pie is direct and unassuming, and at its best, it recalls the homely charm of McCartney and Ram. McCartney still has a tendency to wallow in trite sentiment, and his more ambitious numbers, like the string-drenched epic "Beautiful Night" or the silly Beatlesque psychedelia of "Flaming Pie," fall a little flat. But when he works on a small scale, as on the waltzing "The Song We Were Singing," "Calico Skies," "Great Day," and "Little Willow," he's gently affecting, and the moderately rocking pop of "The World Tonight" and "Young Boy" is more ingratiating than the pair of aimless bluesy jams with Steve Miller. Even with the filler, which should be expected on any McCartney album, Flaming Pie is one of his most successful latter-day efforts, mainly because McCartney is at his best when he doesn't try so hard and lets his effortless melodic gifts rise to the surface. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine, All Music Guide « less… more »

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  • Neither the dippy, rustic Wild Life nor the slick AOR flourishes of Red Rose Speedway earned Paul McCartney much respect, so he made the self-consciously ambitious Band on the Run to rebuke his critics. On the surface, Band on the... Neither the dippy, rustic Wild Life nor the slick AOR flourishes of Red Rose Speedway earned Paul McCartney much respect, so he made the self-consciously ambitious Band on the Run to rebuke his critics. On the surface, Band on the Run appears to be constructed as a song cycle in the vein of Abbey Road, but subsequent listens reveal that the only similarities the two albums share are simply superficial. McCartney's talent for songcraft and nuanced arrangements is in ample display throughout the record, which makes many of the songs -- including the nonsensical title track -- sound more substantial than they actually are. While a handful of the songs are excellent -- the surging, inspired surrealism of "Jet" is by far one of his best solo recordings, "Bluebird" is sunny acoustic pop, and "Helen Wheels" captures McCartney rocking with abandon -- most of the songs are more style than substance. Yet McCartney's melodies are more consistent than any of his previous solo records, and there are no throwaways; the songs just happen to be not very good. Still, the record is enjoyable, whether it's the minor-key "Mrs. Vandebilt" or "Let Me Roll It," a silly response to John Lennon's "How Do You Sleep?," which does make Band on the Run one of McCartney's finest solo efforts. However, there's little of real substance on the record. No matter how elaborate the production is, or how cleverly his mini-suites are constructed, Band on the Run is nothing more than a triumph of showmanship. [The Parlophone reissue includes the bonus track "Country Dreamer."] ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine, All Music Guide « less… more »

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  • Technically, All the Best was the first compilation of McCartney's solo material, since Wings Greatest covered songs released under the Wings aegis. Well, there is considerable overlap between the two records -- no less than ten o... Technically, All the Best was the first compilation of McCartney's solo material, since Wings Greatest covered songs released under the Wings aegis. Well, there is considerable overlap between the two records -- no less than ten of that album's 12 songs are here, yet only the hard-rocking "Hi Hi Hi" is truly missed -- although the seven new songs do give this album a different character, for better or worse. With the U.S. version of All the Best, which has four different songs than its British counterpart, the balance shifts toward the positive, since it simply boasts a better selection of songs. Yes, "Once Upon a Long Ago," the single offered as bait on the British All the Best, isn't here, but it's not missed since two of the four songs exclusive to the American version are among McCartney's best solo singles ("Junior's Farm," "Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey") and the other two are good adult contemporary easy listening (the previously non-LP "Goodnight Tonight," "With a Little Luck"). These songs add to the retrospective, although it's still not perfect -- such highlights as "Maybe I'm Amazed" and "Take It Away" really should have been included. However, as a cross section of McCartney's solo singles, this is very, very good. It may be a little heavy on the schmaltz at times, yet this is still mainstream pop craft of the highest order. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine, All Music Guide « less… more »

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  • Paul McCartney must not only have been conscious of his slipping commercial fortunes, he must have realized that his records hadn't been treated seriously for years, so he decided to make a full-fledged comeback effort with Flower... Paul McCartney must not only have been conscious of his slipping commercial fortunes, he must have realized that his records hadn't been treated seriously for years, so he decided to make a full-fledged comeback effort with Flowers in the Dirt. His most significant move was to write a series of songs with Elvis Costello, some of which appeared on Costello's own Spike and many of which surfaced here. These may not be epochal songs, the way many wished them to be, but McCartney and Costello turn out to be successful collaborators, spurring each other toward interesting work. And, in McCartney's case, that carried over to the album as a whole, as he aimed for more ambitious lyrics, themes, sounds, and productions for Flowers in the Dirt. This didn't necessarily result in a more successful album than its predecessors, but it had more heart, ambition, and nerve, which was certainly welcome. And the moments that did work were pretty terrific. Many of these were McCartney/McManus collaborations, from the moderate hit "My Brave Face" to the duet "You Want Her Too" and "That Day Is Done," but McCartney also demonstrates considerable muscle on his own, from the domestic journal "We Got Married" to the lovely "This One." This increased ambition also means McCartney meanders a bit, writing songs that are more notable for what they try to achieve than what they do, and at times the production is too fussy and inextricably tied to its time, but as a self-styled comeback affair, Flowers in the Dirt works very well. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine, All Music Guide « less… more »

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  • Someone needs to straighten out their priorities over at Vitamin. While the label issues string tributes of also-ran modern rockers (Chevelle, Godsmack) willy-nilly, it finally gets around to this Paul McCartney guy in 2004. Of co... Someone needs to straighten out their priorities over at Vitamin. While the label issues string tributes of also-ran modern rockers (Chevelle, Godsmack) willy-nilly, it finally gets around to this Paul McCartney guy in 2004. Of course, now that we've heard it, there's no real reason to do so again. These instrumentals, chamber quartet versions of "Yesterday," "Can't Buy Me Love," "Eleanor Rigby," and "Blackbird" are polite but forgettable, fodder for 101 Strings Orchestra fans. ~ Johnny Loftus, All Music Guide

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  • That Paul McCartney has always had a way with pretty melodies is no secret, and ballad-structured songs like "Eleanor Rigby" and "Yesterday" easily retain their essential feel when transferred into string quartet mode, since they ... That Paul McCartney has always had a way with pretty melodies is no secret, and ballad-structured songs like "Eleanor Rigby" and "Yesterday" easily retain their essential feel when transferred into string quartet mode, since they were written with strings in mind in the first place. But what becomes clear on this set of quartet reworkings of McCartney songs done by the Ripieno String Quartet is how much melody is actually at work in more rhythmically driven songs like "Hello Goodbye" and "Band on the Run." It's all quite pleasant, and even beautiful, but truthfully, one starts to miss Ringo after a while. ~ Steve Leggett, All Music Guide

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  • The consensus of critics, as well as cold hard sales figures, says that Band on the Run was Paul McCartney's most successful solo album -- and so, shortly after the 25th anniversary of its release, Band on the Run got the deluxe b... The consensus of critics, as well as cold hard sales figures, says that Band on the Run was Paul McCartney's most successful solo album -- and so, shortly after the 25th anniversary of its release, Band on the Run got the deluxe boxed treatment. The original album itself was remastered yet again, the sound improved only slightly over previous versions, and the track order made to follow that of the U.S. release (the British version does not include "Helen Wheels"). The real attraction of this box, though, is the second disc, a radio-style program containing interviews with Paul, Linda Mac, Wings member Denny Laine, and other contributors, plus demos, rehearsals, assorted outtakes, and edited portions from the original album. The documentary makes it clear that not only was Band on the Run an artistic triumph over very trying conditions -- the defection of two-fifths of Wings and the whimsical decision to record in the primitive, sometimes dangerous conditions of Lagos, Nigeria -- it was a marketing triumph as well. Capitol promotion man Al Coury tells how he spotted the hitmaking potential of "Jet," the album's second single and the one that really launched it into chart orbit. A lot of attention, perhaps too much, is also paid to the making of the album's cover photo, elevating it to the level of the cover art of Sgt. Pepper's and Abbey Road. Interestingly, Laine gets one fact wrong on the interview disc -- they played "Picasso's Last Words," not "Mamunia," in Ginger Baker's Lagos studio -- which Mark Lewisohn's authoritative liner notes make clear. You also get a reproduction of the poster that came with the LP. All of this comes at a two-CDs-for-the-price-of-one deal -- which should be downright irresistible for those who haven't replaced their original LPs. ~ Richard S. Ginell, All Music Guide « less… more »

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  • Unlike its 2002 predecessor Back in the U.S., Good Evening New York City doesn’t cherrypick highlights from a tour, it commemorates a specific event: the inauguration of Citi Field -- the replacement for the now-defunct Shea Stadi... Unlike its 2002 predecessor Back in the U.S., Good Evening New York City doesn’t cherrypick highlights from a tour, it commemorates a specific event: the inauguration of Citi Field -- the replacement for the now-defunct Shea Stadium, where the Beatles played a legendary show in 1965 -- in the summer of 2009. The circumstances may be different -- different enough to lead to a Billy Joel cameo on “I Saw Her Standing There," the piano man returning a favor from Paul, who played at Billy’s Shea-closing shows in 2008 -- and McCartney might have two strong albums of new material to draw upon, but as an album, Good Evening New York City plays a lot like Back in the U.S. with a whopping 17 of its 35 tracks shared between the two titles. More importantly, the vibe is the same, with Macca delivering an expertly balanced and sequenced set with all the skill of the old pro that he is. Apart from the inclusion of “Mrs. Vanderbilt” and “I’m Down,” there are no surprises, either in song selection or performance, but no surprises doesn’t mean no satisfaction, and this is plenty entertaining. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine, All Music Guide « less… more »

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  • The Beatles spy vs spy music comedy "Help" is more or less a string of gags than a actual story. My favorite bit is during the title in which the villain is engaged in a game of darts, but he doesn't use a dart board, instead he's... The Beatles spy vs spy music comedy "Help" is more or less a string of gags than a actual story. My favorite bit is during the title in which the villain is engaged in a game of darts, but he doesn't use a dart board, instead he's projected a movie of the Beatles playing the tittle song, his challenge is to use the heads of John, Paul, George and Ringo as a moving target, how evil. Oh! speaking about evil, when will that evil "Let it Be" DVD get to see the light of day, eh?

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  • Michael Jackson was a true visionary, I'm happy to see how much positive attention his life and art has received.

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  • John Lennon & The Plastic Ono Band Live In Toronto ’69 is a rare look at one of the world’s most influential popular artists at a pivotal moment in his career. Filmed on the eve of the release of the Abbey Road LP — the last Beatl... John Lennon & The Plastic Ono Band Live In Toronto ’69 is a rare look at one of the world’s most influential popular artists at a pivotal moment in his career. Filmed on the eve of the release of the Abbey Road LP — the last Beatles album to be recorded — this is the only performance ever caught on film of John Lennon & the Plastic Ono Band. It had been three years since Lennon had performed onstage with The Beatles. Seemingly on a whim, John and wife Yoko Ono hopped on a plane with guitarist Eric Clapton, bassist Klaus Voormann and drummer Alan White to travel to the Toronto Rock ’N’ Roll Revival festival showcasing some of Lennon’s early musical heroes — among them Bo Diddley, Jerry Lee Lewis, Chuck Berry and Little Richard. As it turned out, Lennon and the newly formed Plastic Ono Band played an equally significant role that night in the history of rock ’n’ roll, as it is widely believed this concert foreshadowed the official end of The Beatles. Captured by Academy Award®–nominated director D.A. Pennebaker (The War Room, Don’t Look Back, Monterey Pop), this concert film serves as one of the great historical documents in the career and life of John Lennon.

  • You've gotta give love to this t-shirt for a few reasons. First, it's a Paul McCartney design. Second, that design is really awesome and completely creative and lots of fun. Finally, it's printed on American Apparel. Brilliant.