John Alexander

John Alexander

Besides the intimate little stores with their troves of treasures, the Chestnut Hill neighborhood in Philadelphia boasts a collection of grand design spaces. John Alexander, for example, occupies a gray stone building that sits squat on a side street. The imposing façade gives way to a loftlike interior filled with natural light and a preeminent collection of British Arts and Crafts furnishings and decorative arts.

  • I can't wait to add these to my collection. Rocky! And there's even a slab of beef accessory.

    Related Products: More from Amazon.com
    Added 7 Years Ago from Amazon.com
  • To open a modern-design store on Antiques Row in Philadelphia, the legendary concentration of golden oldies on Pine Street between 9th and 12th streets, it takes passion as well as chutzpah. And there is plenty of both at Lisa For... To open a modern-design store on Antiques Row in Philadelphia, the legendary concentration of golden oldies on Pine Street between 9th and 12th streets, it takes passion as well as chutzpah. And there is plenty of both at Lisa Formica and Sharne Algotsson’s Twist Home, which offers a diverse assortment of household accessories and gifts, ranging from functional plastic pitchers to Indian-fabric print blocks. It’s also a showcase for interior and furniture designer Algotsson, whose updated Victorian- and locally handmade, mid-century-inspired sofas and chairs are on display.

  • Echoes of Philadelphia's Pine Street reverberate several blocks away, where, at 2010 Walnut Street, Harry A. Eberhardt & Son Inc. has the ring of authenticity. Established in 1888, Philadelphia’s oldest antique shop is now run by ... Echoes of Philadelphia's Pine Street reverberate several blocks away, where, at 2010 Walnut Street, Harry A. Eberhardt & Son Inc. has the ring of authenticity. Established in 1888, Philadelphia’s oldest antique shop is now run by William Eberhardt in an 1856 Italian Renaissance town house, its glorious woodwork and plaster details overshadowed only by the innumerable porcelain and glass pieces lining shelves and floors. Eberhardt sells Japanese cloisonné and Satsuma from the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. It is also the principal restorer for Lladro pieces; fixing the figurines takes up most of Eberhardt’s time. Your local porcelain restorer probably trained at the side of an Eberhardt or an Eberhardt protégé, and it wouldn’t be overstatement to say this Walnut Street refuge is keeping the craft alive in the United States. How’s that for a sign of preeminence?