Gallery51

Gallery51

Craig Wallen, a former consultant for PricewaterhouseCoopers, runs Gallery 51, a showcase for his tribal carpets and weavings from the Middle East and central Asia. His recent show shifted the spotlight to Africa, New Guinea, Borneo and Burma and featured ceremonial and functional objects made of beaten bark cloth, woven cane, tied and dyed raffia and twisted bark string.

  • Antique Armoire from Madura Island made entirely from teak wood. Original paint. Great mix of Indonesian and Dutch design elements.

  • An Antique Balinese Temple Door from the Impact Imports collection. Hand crafted from teak, this piece is a work of art!

  • The Antique Lighthouse makes an outing to Manayunk in Philadelphia worthwhile. Even this destination, a compound of former textile mills, requires looking closer, as it’s located several huffing blocks up the hill behind Main Stre... The Antique Lighthouse makes an outing to Manayunk in Philadelphia worthwhile. Even this destination, a compound of former textile mills, requires looking closer, as it’s located several huffing blocks up the hill behind Main Street. Owner Rollin Wilber isn’t a particularly outgoing guy. But get him talking about his work, restoring lamps from the early electric era or converting late-nineteenth-century kerosene-fueled pieces, and he lights up. During our conversation, he offered to show us the room where he and his staff of six ply their trade. (Ask to see the 1,000-square-foot metal shop that’s also on-site.) Among other large pieces in inventory, a recently restored $21,000, 37-light Maria Teresa chandelier with sine-curve arms was dripping with crystals.

  • Echoes of Philadelphia's Pine Street reverberate several blocks away, where, at 2010 Walnut Street, Harry A. Eberhardt & Son Inc. has the ring of authenticity. Established in 1888, Philadelphia’s oldest antique shop is now run by ... Echoes of Philadelphia's Pine Street reverberate several blocks away, where, at 2010 Walnut Street, Harry A. Eberhardt & Son Inc. has the ring of authenticity. Established in 1888, Philadelphia’s oldest antique shop is now run by William Eberhardt in an 1856 Italian Renaissance town house, its glorious woodwork and plaster details overshadowed only by the innumerable porcelain and glass pieces lining shelves and floors. Eberhardt sells Japanese cloisonné and Satsuma from the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. It is also the principal restorer for Lladro pieces; fixing the figurines takes up most of Eberhardt’s time. Your local porcelain restorer probably trained at the side of an Eberhardt or an Eberhardt protégé, and it wouldn’t be overstatement to say this Walnut Street refuge is keeping the craft alive in the United States. How’s that for a sign of preeminence?