Moderne Gallery

Moderne Gallery

Moderne Gallery presents another excellent selection, mostly from the first half of the twentieth century. A wood carving of a worker, in WPA style, was particularly eye-catching, though it played second fiddle to a large exhibition of work by master mid-century furniture designer George Nakashima, who worked nearby, just outside New Hope, Pennsylvania.

  • On North Second Street in the Old City neighborhood in Philadelphia, the Classic Lighting Emporium is a dizzying showcase for too many chandeliers, table lamps and sconces to count. The pieces represent a kaleidoscope of styles an... On North Second Street in the Old City neighborhood in Philadelphia, the Classic Lighting Emporium is a dizzying showcase for too many chandeliers, table lamps and sconces to count. The pieces represent a kaleidoscope of styles and eras, and homing in on a potential purchase requires concentration.

  • Lovers of textiles, take note: Philadelphia is home of the Fabric Workshop, the country’s only museum for contemporary textiles. Founded in 1977, the Fabric Workshop has "developed from an ambitious experiment to a renowned instit... Lovers of textiles, take note: Philadelphia is home of the Fabric Workshop, the country’s only museum for contemporary textiles. Founded in 1977, the Fabric Workshop has "developed from an ambitious experiment to a renowned institution with a widely-recognized Artist in Residence Program, an extensive permanent collection of new work created by artists at the Workshop, in-house and touring exhibitions, and comprehensive educational programming including lectures, tours, in-school presentations and student apprenticeships.

  • The distinction of outfitting MTV’s The Real World: Philadelphia, which was shot in the Old City neighborhood, goes to Dane Design, which sells new, mod-inspired furnishings.

  • To open a modern-design store on Antiques Row in Philadelphia, the legendary concentration of golden oldies on Pine Street between 9th and 12th streets, it takes passion as well as chutzpah. And there is plenty of both at Lisa For... To open a modern-design store on Antiques Row in Philadelphia, the legendary concentration of golden oldies on Pine Street between 9th and 12th streets, it takes passion as well as chutzpah. And there is plenty of both at Lisa Formica and Sharne Algotsson’s Twist Home, which offers a diverse assortment of household accessories and gifts, ranging from functional plastic pitchers to Indian-fabric print blocks. It’s also a showcase for interior and furniture designer Algotsson, whose updated Victorian- and locally handmade, mid-century-inspired sofas and chairs are on display.

  • Besides the intimate little stores with their troves of treasures, the Chestnut Hill neighborhood in Philadelphia boasts a collection of grand design spaces. John Alexander, for example, occupies a gray stone building that sits sq... Besides the intimate little stores with their troves of treasures, the Chestnut Hill neighborhood in Philadelphia boasts a collection of grand design spaces. John Alexander, for example, occupies a gray stone building that sits squat on a side street. The imposing façade gives way to a loftlike interior filled with natural light and a preeminent collection of British Arts and Crafts furnishings and decorative arts.

  • For new wares, North Third Street’s Minima is a kind of mini Milan furniture fair. The brightly lit white surfaces of this store cast halos around designs from Cappellini, Kartell and Vitra, among others.

  • The most spectacular of the North Third Street shops in Philadelphia has to be bahdeebahdu. Here, lighting designer Warren Muller displays one-of-a-kind pieces made of reclaimed products. Vintage children’s toys, glass vials, beds... The most spectacular of the North Third Street shops in Philadelphia has to be bahdeebahdu. Here, lighting designer Warren Muller displays one-of-a-kind pieces made of reclaimed products. Vintage children’s toys, glass vials, bedsprings, old tools—no castoff is unaesthetic in Muller’s eyes. Bahdeebahdu’s interior furnishings were selected by R. J. Thornburg, with whom Muller opened the 2,300-square-foot showroom in spring 2002.