Bahdeebahdu

Bahdeebahdu

The most spectacular of the North Third Street shops in Philadelphia has to be bahdeebahdu. Here, lighting designer Warren Muller displays one-of-a-kind pieces made of reclaimed products. Vintage children’s toys, glass vials, bedsprings, old tools—no castoff is unaesthetic in Muller’s eyes. Bahdeebahdu’s interior furnishings were selected by R. J. Thornburg, with whom Muller opened the 2,300-square-foot showroom in spring 2002.

  • This is a great looking floor lamp hand crafted in Indonesia from a reclaimed old growth teak railroad tie. there is a separate switch for each of the light bulbs. Modern / Rustic design! From Impact Imports in Boise and Philad... This is a great looking floor lamp hand crafted in Indonesia from a reclaimed old growth teak railroad tie. there is a separate switch for each of the light bulbs. Modern / Rustic design! From Impact Imports in Boise and Philadelphia.

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  • Natural lighting for your garden, pathway, patio or yard. Hand crafted from real river rocks.

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  • On North Second Street in the Old City neighborhood in Philadelphia, the Classic Lighting Emporium is a dizzying showcase for too many chandeliers, table lamps and sconces to count. The pieces represent a kaleidoscope of styles an... On North Second Street in the Old City neighborhood in Philadelphia, the Classic Lighting Emporium is a dizzying showcase for too many chandeliers, table lamps and sconces to count. The pieces represent a kaleidoscope of styles and eras, and homing in on a potential purchase requires concentration.

  • The Antique Lighthouse makes an outing to Manayunk in Philadelphia worthwhile. Even this destination, a compound of former textile mills, requires looking closer, as it’s located several huffing blocks up the hill behind Main Stre... The Antique Lighthouse makes an outing to Manayunk in Philadelphia worthwhile. Even this destination, a compound of former textile mills, requires looking closer, as it’s located several huffing blocks up the hill behind Main Street. Owner Rollin Wilber isn’t a particularly outgoing guy. But get him talking about his work, restoring lamps from the early electric era or converting late-nineteenth-century kerosene-fueled pieces, and he lights up. During our conversation, he offered to show us the room where he and his staff of six ply their trade. (Ask to see the 1,000-square-foot metal shop that’s also on-site.) Among other large pieces in inventory, a recently restored $21,000, 37-light Maria Teresa chandelier with sine-curve arms was dripping with crystals.