Gallery51

Gallery51

Craig Wallen, a former consultant for PricewaterhouseCoopers, runs Gallery 51, a showcase for his tribal carpets and weavings from the Middle East and central Asia. His recent show shifted the spotlight to Africa, New Guinea, Borneo and Burma and featured ceremonial and functional objects made of beaten bark cloth, woven cane, tied and dyed raffia and twisted bark string.

  • On North Second Street in the Old City neighborhood in Philadelphia, the Classic Lighting Emporium is a dizzying showcase for too many chandeliers, table lamps and sconces to count. The pieces represent a kaleidoscope of styles an... On North Second Street in the Old City neighborhood in Philadelphia, the Classic Lighting Emporium is a dizzying showcase for too many chandeliers, table lamps and sconces to count. The pieces represent a kaleidoscope of styles and eras, and homing in on a potential purchase requires concentration.

  • The distinction of outfitting MTV’s The Real World: Philadelphia, which was shot in the Old City neighborhood, goes to Dane Design, which sells new, mod-inspired furnishings.

  • The Antique Lighthouse makes an outing to Manayunk in Philadelphia worthwhile. Even this destination, a compound of former textile mills, requires looking closer, as it’s located several huffing blocks up the hill behind Main Stre... The Antique Lighthouse makes an outing to Manayunk in Philadelphia worthwhile. Even this destination, a compound of former textile mills, requires looking closer, as it’s located several huffing blocks up the hill behind Main Street. Owner Rollin Wilber isn’t a particularly outgoing guy. But get him talking about his work, restoring lamps from the early electric era or converting late-nineteenth-century kerosene-fueled pieces, and he lights up. During our conversation, he offered to show us the room where he and his staff of six ply their trade. (Ask to see the 1,000-square-foot metal shop that’s also on-site.) Among other large pieces in inventory, a recently restored $21,000, 37-light Maria Teresa chandelier with sine-curve arms was dripping with crystals.

  • To open a modern-design store on Antiques Row in Philadelphia, the legendary concentration of golden oldies on Pine Street between 9th and 12th streets, it takes passion as well as chutzpah. And there is plenty of both at Lisa For... To open a modern-design store on Antiques Row in Philadelphia, the legendary concentration of golden oldies on Pine Street between 9th and 12th streets, it takes passion as well as chutzpah. And there is plenty of both at Lisa Formica and Sharne Algotsson’s Twist Home, which offers a diverse assortment of household accessories and gifts, ranging from functional plastic pitchers to Indian-fabric print blocks. It’s also a showcase for interior and furniture designer Algotsson, whose updated Victorian- and locally handmade, mid-century-inspired sofas and chairs are on display.

  • Echoes of Philadelphia's Pine Street reverberate several blocks away, where, at 2010 Walnut Street, Harry A. Eberhardt & Son Inc. has the ring of authenticity. Established in 1888, Philadelphia’s oldest antique shop is now run by ... Echoes of Philadelphia's Pine Street reverberate several blocks away, where, at 2010 Walnut Street, Harry A. Eberhardt & Son Inc. has the ring of authenticity. Established in 1888, Philadelphia’s oldest antique shop is now run by William Eberhardt in an 1856 Italian Renaissance town house, its glorious woodwork and plaster details overshadowed only by the innumerable porcelain and glass pieces lining shelves and floors. Eberhardt sells Japanese cloisonné and Satsuma from the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. It is also the principal restorer for Lladro pieces; fixing the figurines takes up most of Eberhardt’s time. Your local porcelain restorer probably trained at the side of an Eberhardt or an Eberhardt protégé, and it wouldn’t be overstatement to say this Walnut Street refuge is keeping the craft alive in the United States. How’s that for a sign of preeminence?

  • Besides the intimate little stores with their troves of treasures, the Chestnut Hill neighborhood in Philadelphia boasts a collection of grand design spaces. John Alexander, for example, occupies a gray stone building that sits sq... Besides the intimate little stores with their troves of treasures, the Chestnut Hill neighborhood in Philadelphia boasts a collection of grand design spaces. John Alexander, for example, occupies a gray stone building that sits squat on a side street. The imposing façade gives way to a loftlike interior filled with natural light and a preeminent collection of British Arts and Crafts furnishings and decorative arts.

  • For new wares, North Third Street’s Minima is a kind of mini Milan furniture fair. The brightly lit white surfaces of this store cast halos around designs from Cappellini, Kartell and Vitra, among others.

  • Moderne Gallery presents another excellent selection, mostly from the first half of the twentieth century. A wood carving of a worker, in WPA style, was particularly eye-catching, though it played second fiddle to a large exhibiti... Moderne Gallery presents another excellent selection, mostly from the first half of the twentieth century. A wood carving of a worker, in WPA style, was particularly eye-catching, though it played second fiddle to a large exhibition of work by master mid-century furniture designer George Nakashima, who worked nearby, just outside New Hope, Pennsylvania.