Marie Colette

Marie Colette

Where some of us merely deal in the past, Philidelphia-based Marie Colette <i>lives</i> in it. Her specialty is tempera painting, a technique usually associated with the walls of Renaissance churches and Baroque mansions. Colette, a French émigré, carries on the tradition with interior projects around the region. You’ll also find painted furniture for sale in her narrow little shop on Germantown Avenue (take care not to miss the fading hand-painted sign). If you’re lucky enough to be in the Chestnut Hill neighborhood on a Monday, call Colette ahead of time and you can grab a slot in her weekly studio class.

  • On North Second Street in the Old City neighborhood in Philadelphia, the Classic Lighting Emporium is a dizzying showcase for too many chandeliers, table lamps and sconces to count. The pieces represent a kaleidoscope of styles an... On North Second Street in the Old City neighborhood in Philadelphia, the Classic Lighting Emporium is a dizzying showcase for too many chandeliers, table lamps and sconces to count. The pieces represent a kaleidoscope of styles and eras, and homing in on a potential purchase requires concentration.

  • Lovers of textiles, take note: Philadelphia is home of the Fabric Workshop, the country’s only museum for contemporary textiles. Founded in 1977, the Fabric Workshop has "developed from an ambitious experiment to a renowned instit... Lovers of textiles, take note: Philadelphia is home of the Fabric Workshop, the country’s only museum for contemporary textiles. Founded in 1977, the Fabric Workshop has "developed from an ambitious experiment to a renowned institution with a widely-recognized Artist in Residence Program, an extensive permanent collection of new work created by artists at the Workshop, in-house and touring exhibitions, and comprehensive educational programming including lectures, tours, in-school presentations and student apprenticeships.

  • Echoes of Philadelphia's Pine Street reverberate several blocks away, where, at 2010 Walnut Street, Harry A. Eberhardt & Son Inc. has the ring of authenticity. Established in 1888, Philadelphia’s oldest antique shop is now run by ... Echoes of Philadelphia's Pine Street reverberate several blocks away, where, at 2010 Walnut Street, Harry A. Eberhardt & Son Inc. has the ring of authenticity. Established in 1888, Philadelphia’s oldest antique shop is now run by William Eberhardt in an 1856 Italian Renaissance town house, its glorious woodwork and plaster details overshadowed only by the innumerable porcelain and glass pieces lining shelves and floors. Eberhardt sells Japanese cloisonné and Satsuma from the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. It is also the principal restorer for Lladro pieces; fixing the figurines takes up most of Eberhardt’s time. Your local porcelain restorer probably trained at the side of an Eberhardt or an Eberhardt protégé, and it wouldn’t be overstatement to say this Walnut Street refuge is keeping the craft alive in the United States. How’s that for a sign of preeminence?

  • Craig Wallen, a former consultant for PricewaterhouseCoopers, runs Gallery 51, a showcase for his tribal carpets and weavings from the Middle East and central Asia. His recent show shifted the spotlight to Africa, New Guinea, Born... Craig Wallen, a former consultant for PricewaterhouseCoopers, runs Gallery 51, a showcase for his tribal carpets and weavings from the Middle East and central Asia. His recent show shifted the spotlight to Africa, New Guinea, Borneo and Burma and featured ceremonial and functional objects made of beaten bark cloth, woven cane, tied and dyed raffia and twisted bark string.