X-Men: Phoenix - Endsong (9780785119241): Greg Pak, Greg Land: Books

X-Men: Phoenix - Endsong (9780785119241): Greg Pak, Greg Land: Books

Gracefuuly written by Greg Pak.

  • Hello humans, I am “Follow the don” “The artist from outer space” . I bring forth more works for your viewing and buying. This one is a radioactive space phoenix alien that has come for your amusement and to create trouble with it... Hello humans, I am “Follow the don” “The artist from outer space” . I bring forth more works for your viewing and buying. This one is a radioactive space phoenix alien that has come for your amusement and to create trouble with its radio’s and and raidoactiveness. The creation process for this one followed the same as the others. The original picture was of fire. It was bonfire, I used my cannon Ti3 to photograph the flame but with a long shutter speed like 5 sec or 10 sec with me moving the camera around to create light paintings of the fire. The fire formed into the shape of a bird. At home I further manipulated the original to create more bird like features and for the T-shirt and other phoenixes I used the erasing tool so the fire would be more transparent.I used the liquefaction tool a bit to create more motion like flame and also used the color mixing tool to give its colors.I don’t know if this phoenix would fight the others or get along, only time can tell, it is a bird of prey after all.

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  • handcrafted indie necklace made from vintage bullet casings

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  • I'm actually as sick of bird stuff as the rest of you, but this...this is no ordinary bird necklace. This is a beautifully cast silver phoenix rising, the perfect gift to give someone who's 'starting a new chapter' in their li... I'm actually as sick of bird stuff as the rest of you, but this...this is no ordinary bird necklace. This is a beautifully cast silver phoenix rising, the perfect gift to give someone who's 'starting a new chapter' in their life. designed by K.baker and comes in gold vermeil as well.

  • So cool and pretty! Phoenix / Fire brid with crystal studs necklace. It comes with a pair of wing earrings.

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  • This is such an amazing bracelet! It is a vintage charm bracelet in MINT condition with five detailed charms. There is a gondola charm from Venice, Italy, an island-shaped charm with 'Nassau Is. New Providence' stamped on it, a cu... This is such an amazing bracelet! It is a vintage charm bracelet in MINT condition with five detailed charms. There is a gondola charm from Venice, Italy, an island-shaped charm with 'Nassau Is. New Providence' stamped on it, a cuckoo clock which is highly detailed on the front and the back and is stamped 800 which is the old European mark for sterling, a Big Ben charm from London, England, and a book charm which is a locket and has a crest with the word 'Tirol' (Italy) and a red phoenix bird on the front. The bracelet itself measures 7" and has a locking slide clasp and a safety chain. This piece is in amazing mint condition!! The bracelet is marked Sterling as well.

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  • i fell in love with this doll immediately! Only for doll lovers!

  • View our online exhibition BLAG 'Passion & Patience' in association with Opus Art Featuring art and photography works by Sally A. Edwards & Sarah J. Edwards Starring Adrien Brody Julian Casablancas Joseph Fiennes Josh Ho... View our online exhibition BLAG 'Passion & Patience' in association with Opus Art Featuring art and photography works by Sally A. Edwards & Sarah J. Edwards Starring Adrien Brody Julian Casablancas Joseph Fiennes Josh Homme Rupert Grint Beastie Boys James McAvoy MGMT Sean Faris Gavin Turk Phoenix Jaime Winstone Broken Bells Jesse Hughes (E0DM) Ed Hogg 'Passion & Patience' will see extremely limited edition works for sale, featuring portraits of some of music and film's award winning and finest talents all personally approved. Talents featured have chosen their favourite charities for which BLAG will donate a % of funds raised. These include: Patrick The Optimist for Phoenix, Humane Society of New York for Adrien Brody, Oxfam for James McAvoy, Nordorf-Robbins for MGMT, House of Fairy Tales for Gavin Turk and Great Ormond Street Hospital for Broken Bells. Opus Art is one of the UKs premier art galleries representing the best in contemporary art and photography. Its extensive roster of artists includes Sir Peter Blake, Helmut Newton, Andy Warhol and Damien Hirst. Links: http://www.weareblag.com/passionandpatience.html http://www.opus-art.com/artists/BLAGPassion&Patience

  • Everybody's always tryin to get mee lucky charms he he

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  • pearl and gold vintage =)

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  • super simple but so cute and unique

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  • Another creation by TRIBE NOUVEAU. Bullet wounds and mermaid nails never looked so good.

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  • There's no two ways about it, I want this necklace.

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  • how rare is a white spade? A locket on a real gold chain what a great gift

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  • Ragz Mo' Intro, What Are We?, The Love Jam, Question of Reflection, Rising of the Phoenix, Rain or Shine, Good Timez, Burden Need, Big Dub Symphony Orchestra, El Amalgado, Hooked, The Headrockaz, East Meetz West, [Untitled Track]

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  • Having scored four consecutive Top Ten albums in the previous two years, Grand Funk Railroad may not have seemed to casual observers like a band who needed to rise phoenix-like from the ashes, but the title of the band's seventh a... Having scored four consecutive Top Ten albums in the previous two years, Grand Funk Railroad may not have seemed to casual observers like a band who needed to rise phoenix-like from the ashes, but the title of the band's seventh album referred to its re-emergence after a litigious split from manager/producer Terry Knight. Now, they were producing themselves, and they added organist Craig Frost, credited here as a sideman, though he went on to join the band formally. The biggest change, however, was a musical maturity. After releasing five studio albums in a little over two years, Grand Funk waited more than a year before releasing Phoenix, and in that time they managed to come up with more variety than they had displayed before. "Someone," for example, was a surprisingly gentle ballad, and "Rain Keeps Fallin'" was stronger melodically than most of songwriter Mark Farner's previous efforts. Unlike earlier albums, Phoenix didn't seem like one rudimentary rocker after another, which made it Grand Funk's most listenable album so far. And that's not to say it didn't rock, as the leadoff instrumental, "Flight of the Phoenix," and the Top 40 hit that closed the set, "Rock 'n Roll Soul," demonstrated. Unfortunately, Farner's lyrical abilities had not increased, while his self-importance had. "I Just Gotta Know," "So You Won't Have to Die," and "Freedom Is for Children" all contained political exhortations expressed in simple-minded terms, the worst being "So You Won't Have to Die," in which Farner, later to become a Christian artist, claimed Jesus had spoken to him on the subject of overpopulation. After such cringe-inducing foolishness, the band's return to rocking with "Rock 'n Roll Soul" could only be welcomed. ~ William Ruhlmann, All Music Guide « less… more »

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  • From his first explosion of recordings in the mid-'50s, Yusef Lateef was a player who was always gently stretching the boundaries of his music to absorb techniques, new rhythms, and new influences from Africa, the Middle East and ... From his first explosion of recordings in the mid-'50s, Yusef Lateef was a player who was always gently stretching the boundaries of his music to absorb techniques, new rhythms, and new influences from Africa, the Middle East and Asia. The Centaur and the Phoenix, however, takes the risks and the innovations that Lateef was known for, and expands them in a number of different directions all at once, leading to an album that bursts with new ideas and textures, while remaining accessible, and above all, beautiful. Lateef seems eager here to take the next step musically by breaking the mold of his previous albums. While he is a gifted composer, only a third of the songs featured here are his work: the rhythm-driven flute showcase "Apathy," the gentle, nocturnal tribute to his daughter "Iqbal" and the tone poem "The Philanthropist." The best of the rest come from Kenny Barron, who was only 17 at the time, and Charles Mills, a contemporary classical composer who drew the album's self-titled highlight from two of his symphonies, the first paying tribute to Crazy Horse and the other to Charlie Parker. Providing the structure and textures needed for these intricate compositions was Lateef's largest ensemble to date. Accustomed to working in a small-group format, he makes managing a band of nine sidemen seem easy. Several Lateef regulars are here, including Barry Harris, Richard Williams, and Ernie Farrow, but the inclusion of forward-thinking musicians like Joe Zawinul also help take this album to a higher level. The greatest miracle of this recording, however, is the balance that Lateef achieves with this large group -- they are always an asset, never a distraction, and even as they come on strong and powerful on songs like "Apathy," or Barron's arrangement of "Ev'ry Day (I Fall in Love)" he remains in charge, somehow making his delicate flute (or oboe, tenor sax or argol) rise above it all, spilling out brightness, grace and joy. ~ Stacia Proefrock, All Music Guide « less… more »

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  • Glen Campbell's commercial breakthrough came by way of the title track, which was the direct precursor in production terms to "Wichita Lineman," and by the same writer. The cover of Paul Simon's "Homeward Bound" is sincere if a li... Glen Campbell's commercial breakthrough came by way of the title track, which was the direct precursor in production terms to "Wichita Lineman," and by the same writer. The cover of Paul Simon's "Homeward Bound" is sincere if a little perfunctory, but Campbell's rendition of Ernest Tubb's "Tomorrow Never Comes" is a bravura performance, rich and soulful, as well as recalling Rodgers & Hammerstein's "You'll Never Walk Alone" as done by Gerry & the Pacemakers. "Cold December in Your Heart" harks back to Campbell's country-folk material, a piece of midtempo country-pop. Material like that and the similar "Back in the Race," Dorsey Burnette's "Hey Little One," Jerry Reed's "You're Young and You'll Forget," and Bill Anderson's "Bad Seed" hold up better than more pop-focused numbers like "My Baby's Gone," though the string backings on most of these very much date them. The final number here, the touching "Love Is a Lonesome River," makes a brilliant coda. By the Time I Get to Phoenix was reissued in August of 2001 in a newly remastered, upgraded edition, with somewhat crisper sound, as part of Capitol-Nashville's Cornerstones series. ~ Bruce Eder, All Music Guide « less… more »

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  • Standing Still, Hold on to Your Heart, Catching Up

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  • Agathodaimon's suitably named fifth album, 2009's Phoenix, acknowledges the band's by now far from certain rebirth after five years of silence, numerous personnel changes (four of these six musicians are in fact new to the fold), and, perhaps, continuing reinvention from a stylistic standpoint. After all, when they last crawled out of their cobwebbed catacombs hoisting 2004's Serpent's Embrace LP, Agathodaimon were in the midst of a sonic metamorphosis that saw portions of their harsher black metal qualities supplanted by more sedate goth and dark metal overtones, causing some understandably mixed reactions from their acolytes. And in a move that's sure to prove just as divisive, Agathodaimon's ongoing creative shape-shifting sees Phoenix generally confining the symphonic orchestration that was once so integral to the group's sonic aesthetic to a supporting or background role (the rare exception, "Oncoming Storm," is hidden toward the end), and restricting black metal to the raspy screeches of longtime frontman Sathonys -- himself now taking a back seat to new goth-flavored vocalist Ashtrael. As a result, unfamiliar but certainly more accessible new offerings like "Heliopolis" and "Ground Zero" boast harmonies reminiscent of Gothenburg death metal bands like In Flames and Dark Tranquillity, while the likes of "Devil's Deal" and "Winterchild" howl to the same goth metal gods as Moonspell or Tiamat once did. Usually, these token examples of the band's new direction comport themselves with significantly less pomp and circumstance than may satisfy the doleful, blood-craving undead among the band's retinue, as well as the extreme metal-loving contingent, who may actually spontaneously combust over the cleanly sung chorus dominating "To Our Ashes.'" But, whether they'll admit it or not, even these two aggrieved parties would still be hard-pressed to find songs more intricate in composition and densely layered with clever, unexpected ideas, like the excellent change-of-pace guitar riff wheeled out halfway through "Ghost of a Soul" and the resurgent black metal violence woven into the novel experiments during "Throughout the Fields of Unshaded Grace," for example. Therefore, before condemning Agathodaimon outright for insisting on evolving, old fans would do well to give their latest baroque metal vision some time to reveal its darker secrets; they may actually quite like them, in the end. ~ Eduardo Rivadavia, All Music Guide « less… more »

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  • Like the Phoenix of the title of their 2008 album, Asia has risen from the ashes and made their first studio album with their original lineup in a quarter century. The remarkable thing about Phoenix is that in pure sonic terms, it... Like the Phoenix of the title of their 2008 album, Asia has risen from the ashes and made their first studio album with their original lineup in a quarter century. The remarkable thing about Phoenix is that in pure sonic terms, it could have appeared as the sequel to Alpha in 1985 instead of the Steve Howe-less Astra, which is a remarkable achievement in many ways, but what makes the album more interesting is that it is suffused with a sense of mortality. This is no doubt due in part to singer/songwriter/bassist John Wetton's brush with death via open heart surgery in 1997, but his frankness in regards to death gives Phoenix an emotional pull that Asia lacked on their twin blockbusters of 1982's Asia and 1983's Alpha. This makes Phoenix a richer experience, but the nice thing about the album is that it's also easy to appreciate on a simpler musical level, in how the band has a suppleness when they stretch out into multi-part suites while retaining a knack for big, arena pop hooks. All this adds up to a comeback that is surprisingly compelling and surprisingly moving, something that only die-hard fans may have suspected the band still had in them. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine, All Music Guide « less… more »

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  • Say what you will of their flat-ironed haircuts, wordy song titles, and relationships with exasperating Hollywood starlets, but the boys in Fall Out Boy put on a fairly tight show. Still, is that enough to save Live in Phoenix fro... Say what you will of their flat-ironed haircuts, wordy song titles, and relationships with exasperating Hollywood starlets, but the boys in Fall Out Boy put on a fairly tight show. Still, is that enough to save Live in Phoenix from being dragged underwater by its own weight? Recorded during the Infinity on High tour, this CD/DVD package features both sides of the band: the talented emo-rock outfit headed by vocalist Patrick Stump (displayed on the audio disc), and the flashy, image-conscious group with Pete Wentz at the center (as evidenced by the DVD). The video portion is enjoyable enough, particularly if you're a dedicated fan, as the pyrotechnics and confetti cannons add a bit of spectacle to the band's performance. At the same time, it's all too easy to overlook Patrick Stump's presence when you're given those visuals, and his contributions are the real meat of Fall Out Boy's sound. Wentz may be the most famous bandmember (even if his agenda seems to center on three things here: screaming into the microphone, introducing songs with unintentionally hilarious speeches, and wearing a fashionable hoodie during the height of summer in an Arizona nightclub), but Stump proves his worth as one of the most competent emo vocalists around, nailing the high notes in "This Ain't a Scene, It's an Arms Race" and plowing his way through series after series of tongue-twisting melodies. He deserves more recognition, and the fact that Pete Wentz so easily hijacks the spotlight shows why many critics dismiss this band. Then again, perhaps the CD's messy cover of "Beat It" is to blame. John Mayer makes a brief appearance on the song's guitar solo, but his presence only heightens the realization that we're listening to Fall Out Boy and John Mayer, not the celebrated partnership of Michael Jackson and Eddie Van Halen. When the bandmates stick to their talents, Live in Phoenix shows them to be competent musicians who've been irrationally slandered by those outside the emo circle. But when Fall Out Boy overstep their boundaries, this album threatens to capsize, regardless of the strength of the performances. ~ Andrew Leahey, All Music Guide « less… more »

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  • Alphabetical is Phoenix's second album, trailing their debut by nearly four years. It's much less of a mishmash than its predecessor, basing itself around the group's soft, cunningly arranged pop that occasionally reaches beyond '... Alphabetical is Phoenix's second album, trailing their debut by nearly four years. It's much less of a mishmash than its predecessor, basing itself around the group's soft, cunningly arranged pop that occasionally reaches beyond '70s AM and '80s sophisti-pop to slip in discreet traces of hip-hop. During their time away, Phoenix became much more proficient as synthesists; certain moments on 2000's United seemed to signal, "Here's where we declare our love of country music," or "Here's the song where we try to sound exactly like Todd Rundgren." This issue has been fixed; the seams that bind their inspirations are now less visible. They're also much better songwriters now, but the lack of variation -- in tempo and in sound -- nearly wipes out the positives by leaving the album with a sluggishness. It's particularly troublesome if you're not in a very specific mood (not simply laid-back, but a kind of laid-back) and want to stay there for the duration of the listen. The album would've benefited from a song or two with the vigor of United's "Too Young" and "If I Ever Feel Better" to break up the monotony; and tracks three through 11 are nowhere near the high level of tracks one and two, making the album drag all the more as it plays out. If not a qualified across-the-board improvement, Alphabetical is at least a good record by a group with plenty of unrealized potential. Perhaps they should stick to singles. ~ Andy Kellman, All Music Guide « less… more »

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  • On their debut album for Astralwerks/Source, Phoenix applies a slick electronica aesthetic to traditional pop/rock songwriting, resulting in a quite adventurous album capable of re-organizing perceptions about 1980s-style verse-ch... On their debut album for Astralwerks/Source, Phoenix applies a slick electronica aesthetic to traditional pop/rock songwriting, resulting in a quite adventurous album capable of re-organizing perceptions about 1980s-style verse-chorus-verse guitar pop. Of course, the fact that the group members come from France gives them the necessary perspective on commercial American pop/rock from the past. With this perspective, they bring fresh life to something that grew stale fast, primarily with their textural approach to songwriting. For instance, the catchy vocal hook from "Too Young" seems far too melodic for its own good, mostly from the pristine production that brings an uncanny gleam to Thomas Mars' already warm voice. Furthermore, one can pick pretty much any instrument in any given song and appreciate the way the sounds come alive in ways that few pop/rock songs are capable of: the percussion gently rattles far too crisply, the bass guitar sounds more like a house bassline than an actual guitar riff, and the subtle guitar sounds seem just too little like the oft-stale sounds that have been associated with guitars over the years. In sum, the album sounds great, but the allure goes deeper than just production. The band understands how to write catchy songs that manage to retain an innocent aura of simplicity and accessibility without coming off contrived. To just think of United as an album of slick pop/rock postmodernism would be cheapening; think of the album as an uncanny yet earnest showcase of what makes pop/rock pop without the gaudy trendiness that now makes the 1980s seem so distasteful. ~ Jason Birchmeier, All Music Guide « less… more »

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  • The Phoenix is Marcus Johnson's tenth recording and features 11 brand new songs from both new and established songwriters. The keyboardist/composer/producer offers a solid and balanced set filled with urban grooves, contemporary j... The Phoenix is Marcus Johnson's tenth recording and features 11 brand new songs from both new and established songwriters. The keyboardist/composer/producer offers a solid and balanced set filled with urban grooves, contemporary jazz, R&B and hip-hop with a little help from friends -- saxophonist Phillip Martin, vocalist Frank McComb and guitarist Stanley Cooper, among others. Johnson has developed a real talent for smooth jazz as well as having a hand in getting inside the groove and soul of his R&B cohort Raheem DeVaughn's smash hit titled "Believe." Johnson's collage of wide-ranged and interesting material is capped off with the radio hit "The Road to Los Suenos," a real smooth burner with vocals by Nikki Gonzalez that should have the club scene happening with its thumping evocation of R&B and ebullient rhythms. This song is hot and a sure sign that The Phoenix's track list is, too. "Urban Trust" kicks with its strong, funky basslines and rocking guitar solos. But it's Johnson who surprises the most on this one with his notable retro elements and sophisticated riffs that keep you hooked. Strong sax playing from Phillip Martin on "The Journey" makes it a real keeper, while Frank McComb's smooth crooning on "Love" will have you under his influence. Marcus Johnson has never forgotten his core audience but The Phoenix is sure to garner more international fans at the other end of the musical spectrum because of the reworked Latin funk fusion. Recommended. ~ Paula Edelstein, All Music Guide « less… more »

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  • After avoiding the sophomore slump with relative ease, Phoenix return with their third release stripped of the post-disco house sound that helped to define them, focusing more on the songwriting side of things than any sort of dan... After avoiding the sophomore slump with relative ease, Phoenix return with their third release stripped of the post-disco house sound that helped to define them, focusing more on the songwriting side of things than any sort of dancefloor-focused groove. In fact, it takes until the fourth song, "Long Distance Call," for anything resembling a dancefloor beat to appear, and when it does it feels like an epilogue to the wonderful "If I Ever Feel Better" off the group's debut record. The band has definitely learned a thing or two through its evolution, placing more of an emphasis on guitar than before (Laurent Brancowitz and Christian Mazzalai sound as if they've been in the woodshed studying the chops of Johnny Marr and the twin-guitar attack of the Strokes' last few records), and their performances sound more confident than ever. Gone are the sluggish country-infused downtempo numbers, replaced with a more even-keeled track sequencing and tempo throughout -- almost as if they've been able to focus on the things that make the band so engaging to begin with, monopolize on them, and move forward in a refreshing and vibrant direction. ~ Rob Theakston, All Music Guide « less… more »

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  • His first solo album since 1977's Netherlands, Phoenix was a fine effort but one that didn't add any new twists to Fogelberg's ever-expanding vision apparent up till then on one album after another. The album paled somewhat in com... His first solo album since 1977's Netherlands, Phoenix was a fine effort but one that didn't add any new twists to Fogelberg's ever-expanding vision apparent up till then on one album after another. The album paled somewhat in comparison to Fogelberg's previous efforts and didn't do much to expand his audience. On the other hand, it certainly didn't dissuade many from continuing to support him through buying his records and seeing him play live, both of which contributed to his receiving extensive airplay. "Longer" is perhaps the best track on the album and quickly became a live favorite. The title cut proved again that Fogelberg could rock, and as punk and new wave began creeping into the mainstream, Fogelberg appeared to be one artist who would not fade away as tastes changed. ~ Steve Matteo, All Music Guide « less… more »

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  • Realigned with Philippe Zdar, the half of Cassius who mixed United, Phoenix make adjustments on the polarizing characteristics of their second and third albums -- the pokey and occasionally listless Alphabetical, the jagged and tu... Realigned with Philippe Zdar, the half of Cassius who mixed United, Phoenix make adjustments on the polarizing characteristics of their second and third albums -- the pokey and occasionally listless Alphabetical, the jagged and tune-deficient It's Never Been Like That -- with some of the most direct and enjoyable songs they've made to date. The two opening songs, the bopping "Lisztomania" and the buzzing "1901," are so immediate and prone to habitual play that the remainder of the album is bound to be neglected. There is plenty to like beyond that point, including "Lasso," which niftily alternates between a tangled rhythm and tight-spiral riffing, and the labyrinthine "Pt. 1" of "Love Like a Sunset," which serves the same purpose as the extended instrumental passages on Roxy Music's Avalon, at least until its rousing conclusion and shift into "Pt. 2." Beyond containing the band's best, most efficient songwriting, the album also stands apart from the first three studio albums by projecting a cool punch that is unforced. Vocalist Thomas Mars, more bright-eyed and youthful than ever, also sounds more a part of these songs, rather than coming across as a protruding element that clashes against the instruments. Maybe they've just hit their stride. ~ Andy Kellman, All Music Guide « less… more »

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  • rising from the fire it's.... bird, it's a necklace, it's a Flash Drive!!!!

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