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Ralph's World - Online Shopping Cart

Ralph's World - Online Shopping Cart

Ralph Covert has been the frontman for a hugely popular Chicago-based band called The Bad Examples for years. Like They Might be Giants and Dan Zanes, he's ventured into the world of children's music and created songs that you and your kids will truly enjoy listening to. Heck, I like Ralph so much that I'll put in a Ralph's World cd when the 5 year old isn't around. Yeah, it's a little embarrassing, but there are some songs that are really beautiful, such as "Bedtime Girl" whick sometimes makes me teary eyed. I'm kind of a dork, though. I cried when I saw Andrew Lloyd Weber's "Starlight Express" and sometimes, I cry when I see Disney films. But hey, buy a CD. I'm 100% positive you will like it. You may not be as sappy as I am, but you will enjoy the music.

  • Make a little birdhouse in your soul.

  • After being dropped by Capitol, Jimmy Eat World returned in 2001 with their most consistent and accessible album to date. Recorded entirely on the band's dime, before they had a new record deal, Bleed American features compelling ... After being dropped by Capitol, Jimmy Eat World returned in 2001 with their most consistent and accessible album to date. Recorded entirely on the band's dime, before they had a new record deal, Bleed American features compelling lyrics, driving guitar work, and insanely catchy melodies. Left to their own devices during the recording process, it wouldn't have been surprising if the band had turned out another layered, sprawling album akin to their previous full-length masterwork, Clarity. Perhaps sensing that they wouldn't be able to top their previous work when it came to spacey emo, Bleed American heads in a new direction. There are no 16-minute songs here, just straight-ahead rock & roll, performed with punk energy and alt-rock smarts. The title track sets the tone for the album with its blistering guitar attack and aggressive vocals. "A Praise Chorus" and "The Middle" improve upon that formula, maintaining the forceful instrumentation but toying with the lyrical themes. "A Praise Chorus" uses the most basic of rock emotions for lyrical inspiration, "I wanna fall in love tonight," while lifting lyrics from Tommy James' "Crimson and Clover," They Might Be Giants' "Don't Let's Start," and Mötley Crüe's "Kick Start My Heart," among others. When used in a song about the comfort and trappings of nostalgia, this borrowing comes off more like a well-placed tribute than stealing. "The Middle" offers a pep talk about self-acceptance and fitting in, and one of the most memorable guitar riffs this side of Angus Young. Bleed American's quieter moments recall some of the band's signature instrumentation from their previous work. Gentle keyboards, bells, and stirring background vocals from former that dog. member Rachel Haden enhance the understated beauty of ballads like "Hear You Me" and "Cautioneers." Haden's most enjoyable contribution, however, is to the up-tempo rocker "The Authority Song." On the surface a song about a song (John Mellencamp's "Authority Song"), it also name drops the Beatles' "What Goes On." The numerous references to other bands and other songs reveal that although Jimmy Eat World is a critically acclaimed and incredibly talented band, the members are really just rock fans themselves. If they maintain this level of quality, however, don't be surprised if the next generation of ambitious rockers start writing songs that pay tribute to Jimmy Eat World. [This Japanese version of the album includes a DVD of bonus material.] ~ Mark Vanderhoff, All Music Guide « less… more »

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  • After being dropped by Capitol, Jimmy Eat World returned in 2001 with their most consistent and accessible album to date. Recorded entirely on the band's dime, before they had a new record deal, Bleed American features compelling ... After being dropped by Capitol, Jimmy Eat World returned in 2001 with their most consistent and accessible album to date. Recorded entirely on the band's dime, before they had a new record deal, Bleed American features compelling lyrics, driving guitar work, and insanely catchy melodies. Left to their own devices during the recording process, it wouldn't have been surprising if the band had turned out another layered, sprawling album akin to their previous full-length masterwork, Clarity. Perhaps sensing that they wouldn't be able to top their previous work when it came to spacy emo, Bleed American heads in a new direction. There are no 16-minute songs here, just straight-ahead rock & roll, performed with punk energy and alt-rock smarts. The title track sets the tone for the album with its blistering guitar attack and aggressive vocals. "A Praise Chorus" and "The Middle improve upon that formula, maintaining the forceful instrumentation but toying with the lyrical themes. "A Praise Chorus" uses the most basic of rock emotions for lyrical inspiration, "I wanna fall in love tonight," while lifting lyrics from Tommy James' "Crimson and Clover," They Might Be Giants' "Don't Let's Start," and Mötley Crüe's "Kick Start My Heart," among others. When used in a song about the comfort and trappings of nostalgia, this borrowing comes off more like a well-placed tribute than stealing. "The Middle" offers a pep talk about self-acceptance and fitting in, and one of the most memorable guitar riffs this side of Angus Young. Bleed American's quieter moments recall some of the band's signature instrumentation from their previous work. Gentle keyboards, bells, and stirring background vocals from former that dog. member Rachel Haden enhance the understated beauty of ballads like "Hear You Me" and "Cautioneers." Haden's most enjoyable contribution, however, is to the up-tempo rocker "The Authority Song." On the surface a song about a song (John Mellencamp's "Authority Song), it also name drops the Beatles' "What Goes On." The numerous references to other bands and other songs reveal that although Jimmy Eat World is a critically acclaimed and incredibly talented band, the members are really just rock fans themselves. If they maintain this level of quality, however, don't be surprised if the next generation of ambitious rockers start writing songs that pay tribute to Jimmy Eat World. [The 2008 Deluxe reissue of the album lives up to the deluxe tag, featuring an entire disc's worth of b-sides, live tracks, demos and an unreleased version of "Your House". Many of the tracks were released in Japan, the UK, or Germany, it's nice to have them all gathered together in one spot. None of the extras stand out as relevatory or essential, but they do add quite a bit of background to one of the few pop/punk or emo albums likely to stand the test of time.] ~ Mark Vanderhoff & Tim Sendra, All Music Guide « less… more »

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  • After being dropped by Capitol, Jimmy Eat World returned in 2001 with their most consistent and accessible album to date. Recorded entirely on the band's dime before they had a new record deal, Bleed American features compelling l... After being dropped by Capitol, Jimmy Eat World returned in 2001 with their most consistent and accessible album to date. Recorded entirely on the band's dime before they had a new record deal, Bleed American features compelling lyrics, driving guitar work, and insanely catchy melodies. Left to their own devices during the recording process, it wouldn't have been surprising if the band had turned out another layered, sprawling album akin to their previous full-length masterwork, Clarity. Perhaps sensing that they wouldn't be able to top their previous work when it came to spacy emo, Bleed American heads in a new direction. There are no 16-minute songs here, just straight-ahead rock & roll, performed with punk energy and alt-rock smarts. The title track sets the tone for the album with its blistering guitar attack and aggressive vocals. "A Praise Chorus" and "The Middle improve upon that formula, maintaining the forceful instrumentation but toying with the lyrical themes. "A Praise Chorus" uses the most basic of rock emotions for lyrical inspiration, "I wanna fall in love tonight," while lifting lyrics from Tommy James' "Crimson and Clover," They Might Be Giants' "Don't Let's Start," and Mötley Crüe's "Kick Start My Heart," among others. When used in a song about the comfort and trappings of nostalgia, this borrowing comes off more like a well-placed tribute than stealing. "The Middle" offers a pep talk about self-acceptance and fitting in, and one of the most memorable guitar riffs this side of Angus Young. Bleed American's quieter moments recall some of the band's signature instrumentation from their previous work. Gentle keyboards, bells, and stirring background vocals from former that dog. member Rachel Haden enhance the understated beauty of ballads like "Hear You Me" and "Cautioneers." Haden's most enjoyable contribution, however, is to the up-tempo rocker "The Authority Song." On the surface a song about a song (John Mellencamp's "Authority Song), it also name drops the Beatles' "What Goes On." The numerous references to other bands and other songs reveal that although Jimmy Eat World is a critically acclaimed and incredibly talented band, the members are really just rock fans themselves. If they maintain this level of quality, however, don't be surprised if the next generation of ambitious rockers start writing songs that pay tribute to Jimmy Eat World. ~ Mark Vanderhoff, All Music Guide « less… more »

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  • Covering the songs of Paul McCartney's solo career is a daunting task. Not only is there a certain stigma attached to the material (sometimes deservedly, sometimes not), but there's also the fact that McCartney's buoyant melodies ... Covering the songs of Paul McCartney's solo career is a daunting task. Not only is there a certain stigma attached to the material (sometimes deservedly, sometimes not), but there's also the fact that McCartney's buoyant melodies beg to be sung by a powerhouse vocalist; a band with a singer of average range risks masking the elegance of McCartney's best popcraft. In a way, then, it's surprising that Listen to What the Man Said works as well as it does. Modern rock acts sift through nearly two decades of Sir Paul's music, embracing hits and relative obscurities with equal frequency (though it's rather telling that the producers chose to include only two of McCartney's post-1980 numbers). Semisonic gets "Jet" exactly right, capturing all the fuzzy brilliance of the original, while Linus of Hollywood makes "Warm and Beautiful" one long, contented sigh of billowy harmony vocals ricocheting Brian Wilson style across the a cappella arrangement. Even better is Owsley's "Band on the Run," which remains vital while staying relentlessly faithful to McCartney's vision -- not an easy feat considering the jigsaw-like nature of the suite's various parts. To be sure, the disc isn't free of filler. Punk-pop outfit SR-71's take on "My Brave Face" is hopelessly stylized and feels bland and contrived as a result, the overblown psychedelia of the Minus 5's "Dear Friend" brings to mind McCartney's own excesses, and They Might Be Giants' instrumental reworking of "Ram On" ends up surprisingly devoid of life. Perhaps it says something about McCartney's skill as a pop arranger that the best covers here are those that don't experiment too much; either way, Listen to What the Man Said isn't going to go down as a timeless album, but it has enough moments of pop pleasure to be recommended to the more adventurous McCartney fans. ~ Kenneth Bays, All Music Guide « less… more »

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  • includes Wall of Voodoo, David Bowie, Throwing Muses, The Pretenders, The Pogues, Squeeze and more.... From Amazon.com: "This seasonal adjunct to Rhino's 15-volume proto-alternative series of '80s favorites is characterized as... includes Wall of Voodoo, David Bowie, Throwing Muses, The Pretenders, The Pogues, Squeeze and more.... From Amazon.com: "This seasonal adjunct to Rhino's 15-volume proto-alternative series of '80s favorites is characterized as much by sweetness as wigginess: check out XTC's "Thanks for Christmas" and Squeeze's "Christmas Day," the latter of which name-checks everything from tree lights to British comedy team Morecambe and Wise. Closest to true new-wave sound and spirit is They Might Be Giants' Farfisa-driven "Santa's Beard," but this eclectic mix's stretches generally succeed. Still, a couple of complaints: why a dreary "Little Drummer Boy" by Miracle Legion instead of the turbocharged one from Joan Jett's I Love Rock n' Roll? But it's churlish to complain about a record so well-meaning that it stacks up a blindingly good "Rudolph" by Los Lobos, a vintage single by Matthew Sweet's early Buzz of Delight, and "Fairytale of New York" by the Pogues and Kirsty MacColl--what a tearjerker. --Rickey Wright "

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  • If you are looking for some quality indie pop rock music, I recommend School for the Dead. Fans of Fountains of Wayne, They Might Be Giants, The Lucksmiths, Death Cab For Cutie, The Decemberists, Robyn HItchcock, or XTC will dig ... If you are looking for some quality indie pop rock music, I recommend School for the Dead. Fans of Fountains of Wayne, They Might Be Giants, The Lucksmiths, Death Cab For Cutie, The Decemberists, Robyn HItchcock, or XTC will dig it. Nice friendly sunny songs and some moving smart tunes. I hope you like it.

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  • By Matthew Baldwin (Defective Yeti) for Alpha Mom His newest release, “Meltdown!” only reaffirms what he demonstrated in his previous four CDs: that the appeal of truly good music spans the generations, regardless of whether i... By Matthew Baldwin (Defective Yeti) for Alpha Mom His newest release, “Meltdown!” only reaffirms what he demonstrated in his previous four CDs: that the appeal of truly good music spans the generations, regardless of whether it's labeled as "children's." Roberts fronted a small alt-folk band out of Minneapolis in a previous life, and the influence is unmistakable in “Meltdown!” The album also showcases the astonishing breadth of Robert's talent. One song sounds as if James Taylor is singing lead vocals for They Might Be Giants; another brings to mind Paul Simon's "Graceland." When my wife entered the room in the middle of "Sand Castles" and asked if it was a new single from Death Cab For Cutie, I knew we had a winner. So it was time to send this one to the CEO for final approval. I queued up the CD while my 24-month son stood nearby, waiting to render judgement. For the first half of the opening song, "I Chalk," he simply stared at the stereo, rapt with attention. Then, as Roberts segued into the chorus, he began a stompy little dance, as if auditioning to become a contestant on "American Clogger." He alternated between intense concentration and merry jigging for the length of the album, and, the moment it ended, shouted "more music!"