iTunes Store: Various Artists - Flicka (Motion Picture Soundtrack)

iTunes Store: Various Artists - Flicka (Motion Picture Soundtrack)

Like many little girls, I dreamed not just riding, but owning a horse. So I enjoyed "Flicka" probably as much, if not more, than any horse-loving ten-year-old girl. The soundtrack was a beautiful accompaniment to the drama with more than a few highlights, including Tim McGraw's "My Little Girl" and the classic "All the Pretty Little Ponies." This is for the cowgirl (or boy) in you.

  • Taylor Swift's first single was "Tim McGraw." So obviously he had a huge influence on her career!

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  • Everywhere may have continued Tim McGraw's streak of hit albums, but it also suggested that he was falling into a bit of a rut. That doesn't seem to have bothered McGraw, since Everywhere's sequel, A Place in the Sun, is much like... Everywhere may have continued Tim McGraw's streak of hit albums, but it also suggested that he was falling into a bit of a rut. That doesn't seem to have bothered McGraw, since Everywhere's sequel, A Place in the Sun, is much like its predecessor in its balance of polished ballads, country-pop and uptempo ravers, which are supposed to sound like honky-tonk but are closer to country-rock. Since he's a professional and works with professionals, A Place in the Sun sounds good and has a number of highlights, from ballads like "My Best Friend" and the Patty Loveless duet "Please Remember Me" to harder numbers like "Something Like That," "My Next Thirty Years" and "She'll Have You Back." The problem is, there's nothing new here -- not only is the music in the same vein as his previous efforts, it has nearly the same ratio of hits to misses. Since the moments that do work are very good, and since it is a stronger overall record than its predecessor, it will be worthwhile for fans, but it doesn't help erase the impression that McGraw won't deliver a truly satisfying album until a greatest-hits compilation comes along. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine, All Music Guide « less… more »

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  • "Indian Outlaw," with its controversy and its resemblance to the Raiders' "Indian Reservation," made Tim McGraw a star and earned him the nickname "Outlaw McGraw." The ballad "Don't Take the Girl" reinforced the image. Not a Momen... "Indian Outlaw," with its controversy and its resemblance to the Raiders' "Indian Reservation," made Tim McGraw a star and earned him the nickname "Outlaw McGraw." The ballad "Don't Take the Girl" reinforced the image. Not a Moment Too Soon contained better hooks than its predecessor, but it also belabored the obvious with songs like "It Don't Get Any Countrier Than This" and "Give It to Me Strait." that said, McGraw's identity as a singer and as a bandleader was being forged bit by bit. Taken as an album, Not a Moment Too Soon is actually a solid listen, containing the first real hints of the influence of Southern rock on his sound, one that would endure. While producer Byron Gallimore seems to get credit for this, it was actually inherent in McGraw's sound from the beginning and Nashville tried to take it out -- until they figured out how to sell it. And while it's true that Hank Williams, Jr. had used the authentic members of that rock subgenre many years before on his Hank Williams, Jr. & Friends album, the mantle hadn't really been picked up since. McGraw not only began to use it, but because of his success beginning with this album -- proving the adage that no publicity is bad publicity -- he spawned countless imitators, making rock & roll a steady part of contemporary country music. ~ Brian Mansfield & Thom Jurek, All Music Guide « less… more »

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  • Tim McGraw's early albums always suffered from uneven material, but All I Want is a surprisingly consistent record that consolidates his strengths while allowing him to expand into new territory. He didn't abandoned the honky tonk... Tim McGraw's early albums always suffered from uneven material, but All I Want is a surprisingly consistent record that consolidates his strengths while allowing him to expand into new territory. He didn't abandoned the honky tonk and jokey country-rock that made him famous, but he made it rock harder and hired songwriters who would help him make it more believable -- just check the track "Renegade" for an example. Similarly, his ballads, such as "I Didn't Ask and She Didn't Say," and "Can't Be Really Gone," are heartfelt; they're delivered with convincing sincerity. In other words, he has grown musically and developed into a thoroughly entertaining vocalist. And that growth is what makes All I Want the best of his early records. It is still somewhat uneven, with several weaker songs, but McGraw learned on his first couple of efforts how to disguise the flaws in the material with his singing and lessen them considerably from here on in. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine & Thom Jurek, All Music Guide « less… more »

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  • Tim McGraw stayed out of recording studios for nearly three years after his smash single and album Live Like You Were Dying. McGraw is a road dog and a husband to Faith Hill. The pair had a child and McGraw comes back to a style o... Tim McGraw stayed out of recording studios for nearly three years after his smash single and album Live Like You Were Dying. McGraw is a road dog and a husband to Faith Hill. The pair had a child and McGraw comes back to a style of country music he helped form in the early '90s. His backing band, the Dance Hall Doctors, is the E Street Band of country music in the 21st century. McGraw -- who, with help from Byron Gallimore and Darran Smith, produced Let It Go -- is once more willing to push the sonic formulaic envelope with a wonderfully textural array of sounds and the moods they help to underscore. (Think, if you will, Mitch Easter as a country music producer with a big road band to rein in.) In fact, the sound of the record, its varied richness, and its pluralities illustrate that this is an era in countrymusic when creatively almost anything is possible. It still comes down to songs, though, and the 13 here are all winners. The honky tonk songs are more so ("Shotgun Rider," "Whiskey and You"), the pop tunes are more on the rock & roll side of pop ("Last Dollar [Fly Away]"), and the romantic and story-songs ("I'm Workin") are so utterly, unabashedly plainspoken, they hit the listener straight in the gut. But the real shock is the psychedelic country-rock of the title cut, written by William C. Luther, Aimee Mayo, and Tom Douglas. There are multi-layered pedal steels, baroquely jangled electric guitars, and McGraw's singular vocals riding above the wall of multivalent yet melodic noise to offer a message of threadbare hope in the face of adversity. In the grain of his voice, you can hear the determination to talk and walk from the place of redemption rather than the terrain of suffering. He's singing to convince himself as much as he is the listener. "Put Your Lovin' on Me" is another one, but this one is an anthem, albeit one that pleads for relief and sustenance. There is an amazing spirituality at work in the songs that McGraw chooses here. A Hammond B-3, spiky guitars, and booming snares and cymbals play at the distortion point in this tune by Hillary Lindsey and Luke Laird, but no matter how loud and proud the music is, McGraw's insistence on delivering an unfettered, albeit desperately sincere, melody is what makes him stand apart. When he sings "Put your lovin' on me/Take this weight off me/Put your lovin' on me," he's way beyond the ledge of asking, "There's nothing here to catch me now/I'm gonna fall anyway." He has nothing to lose and expresses that. The haunting guitars and mandolin lines that introduce "Between the River and Me" offer a story-song that is tough, overblown, and full of anger, regret, and the voice of a man haunted by his anger. The other great rocker is the obligatory country train song called "Train #10." The sound here evokes the arid desert landscapes, where frontier and train tracks meet one another. It's a leaving song that's offered with a vengeance. And, of course, there is the beautiful love song duet between McGraw and Hill in "I Need You," with its provocative line "I need you/Like a needle needs a vein." Hill answers from the loneliest space in her full-throated alto: "I want to dance to the static of a neighing radio/I want to wrap the moon around us/Lay beside you, skin on skin/Make love till the sun comes up/Till the sun goes down again/'Cause I need you." It's the equation of death, addiction, love, and redemption all rolled into a four-minute tune. While this set of songs doesn't have the same unabashed optimism that Live Like You Were Dying does, it is no less so in its own gruff, rock & roll way. That said, this is one of the best interpretations of the country tradition by McGraw yet, and while he no longer has the wild edge of his earlier records, McGraw has something deeper: he can look at the dark side without flinching and bring it up to the light, always looking to find his way home. Let It Go was well worth the wait and McGraw is still at the top of the heap. ~ Thom Jurek, All Music Guide « less… more »

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  • There's good reason for Tim McGraw's endurance at the top of contemporary country: he's a restless visionary who's worked hard to improve as an interpretive singer. In 2002, McGraw bucked the trend and convinced his label, and pro... There's good reason for Tim McGraw's endurance at the top of contemporary country: he's a restless visionary who's worked hard to improve as an interpretive singer. In 2002, McGraw bucked the trend and convinced his label, and producers Byron Gallimore and Darran Smith, to let him use his road band in the studio. The rough and tumble intimacy of the set put it over the top and appealed to music fans outside his circle. On Live Like You Were Dying, McGraw ups the ante. Using the same production team and his Dancehall Doctors, McGraw cut a whopping 16 tracks and helped in the mixing of the record, as well as co-producing. The song selection runs the gamut. There's the blues-rock energy of the opener, "How Bad Do You Want It," where he evokes the ghost of the Mississippi Delta as well as the hard country-rock sounds of Marshall Tucker and Lynyrd Skynyrd. Then there's the shimmering Americana of "My Old Friend" that would not be out of place performed by Pierce Pettis, and the fantastic "Old Town New," by renegade songwriters Bruce Robison and Darrell Scott. The monster single from this record, "Live Like You Were Dying," by Craig Wiseman and Tim Nichols, is the very best kind of modern country song; the emotion in McGraw's delivery is honest, not saccharine. In anyone else's voice, a song like "Drugs or Jesus" would be just plain bad. The tune itself is solid and beautifully constructed, a perfect marriage of melody, hook, and direct, simple lyrics. But the temptation to overperform such a song is irresistible to most of the hit factory's mainstays. Not for McGraw though: his understatement underscores the lyric's seriousness. The tenderness in Rodney Crowell and James T. Slater's "Open Season on My Heart" is vulnerable in all the right ways. The moody poignancy of "Walk Like a Man," is a fine and haunting centerpiece for this fine album. "Kill Myself" has to be experienced -- it's a miracle and a testament to McGraw's clout that this tune made it on to the record. "We Carry On" is a soulful anthem, gritty, true, and beautiful. It's a fitting close to McGraw's finest moment yet. The young hell-raiser has grown to be one of modern country's most compelling and multidimensional artists. ~ Thom Jurek, All Music Guide « less… more »

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  • Indian Outlaw, Maybe We Should Just Sleep on It, My Next Thirty Years

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  • This 16-track, second volume of Tim McGraw's Greatest Hits is a stopgap that generally covers the years 2001-2004, but there are exceptions. There are a pair of tunes from 2001's Set This Circus Down , four from Tim McGraw and the... This 16-track, second volume of Tim McGraw's Greatest Hits is a stopgap that generally covers the years 2001-2004, but there are exceptions. There are a pair of tunes from 2001's Set This Circus Down , four from Tim McGraw and the Dancehall Doctors (2002), and two from Live Like You Were Dying, issued in 2004. You also get the title cuts from 1994's Not a Moment Too Soon, and 1997's Everywhere. Also included are the hit duets -- one with wife Faith Hill, "Like We Never Loved at All," from her 2005 Fireflies set -- and "Over and Over," with Nelly from his Suit disc issued in 2004. From here there are no less than ten bona fide hit songs. McGraw includes four new tunes as well to make the package irresistible to the faithful. There's a slick cover of Ryan Adams' "When the Stars Go Blue," Craig Wiseman and Chris Lindsey's "Beautiful People," "My Little Girl," from the soundtrack to the film Flicka, and an uncredited "bonus track," entitled "I've Got Friends That Do." These cuts are all manned by McGraw's longstanding band the Dancehall Doctors and therefore have the feel of his last four records or so. If you have volume one, there is plenty of reason to have Vol. 2, especially since McGraw, like most other Nash Vegas chart-toppers, issue albums with filler. This second hits package complements the first beautifully, and would more than fill out most any casual country fan's McGraw shelf. ~ Thom Jurek, All Music Guide « less… more »

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  • Really, Tim's Greatest Hits are the best cd's but this is his best actual cd.

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