San Francisco Chefs

San Francisco Chefs

A collection of keepsake recipes from 12 of the Bay Areas most reknown chefs was put together originally to benefit the St. Jude's Children's Research Hospital, and now, as a donated prize to Menu for Hope, will benefit the World Food Programme. The book is not only a cookbook, but also includes profiles of the chef's and stories about how each one got she he or she is now.

  • Fabulous Website: Food, Recipes and the most beautiful art firection and Photography.

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  • Bob Spitz had the dream: go to the cooking schools of Europe. He combes an outrageous travelogue with gastronomic lore, hands-on cooking instruction, hot-tempered chefs, local personalities, and a batch of memorable recipes.

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  • There are many skills to be learned in the kitchen, and knife skills is one of the most critical. For more than 20 years, Norman Weinstein, a chef-instructor at the Institute of Culinary Education, has taught everyone from first-t... There are many skills to be learned in the kitchen, and knife skills is one of the most critical. For more than 20 years, Norman Weinstein, a chef-instructor at the Institute of Culinary Education, has taught everyone from first-time cooks to professional chefs how to select and use knives. "Each cutting, slicing, and chopping method is thoroughly explained—and illustrated with clear, step-by-step photographs. Extras include information on knife construction, knife makers and types, knife maintenance and safety, and cutting boards, as well as a 30-minute instructional DVD featuring Weinstein’s most important techniques." Learn to cut it right!

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  • No, no, don’t use your measuring cup to scoop your flour! You need to pour the flour into your measuring cup so it doesn’t compress. Then be sure to take the back of a knife and level the cup. Oh, by the way, you probably should t... No, no, don’t use your measuring cup to scoop your flour! You need to pour the flour into your measuring cup so it doesn’t compress. Then be sure to take the back of a knife and level the cup. Oh, by the way, you probably should take that knife and stir up all the flour before you start scooping; it settles during shipping. And yeah, you need to do this whole procedure with each cup you measure out. Or, you could use a scale. While the rest of the world weighs most ingredients, we, here in the States, measure them. And measuring is not especially accurate. Is a cup of bran the same as a cup of whole-wheat flour? Not by weight. In fact, a cup of unsifted white flour will weigh five ounces, while a cup of sifted flour will weigh only four ounces. And if you’re baking bread that uses eight cups of flour, then you’ve just added one full cup of flour. In baking that leads to disaster. Read more at

  • Agave nectar is a sweetener from the cactus plant it is grown in Jalisco, Tequila, Guadalajara, and Cuquio, Mexico. It is available at health food stores. As a sweetener, Agave nectar, also known as Agave syrup, is notable in tha... Agave nectar is a sweetener from the cactus plant it is grown in Jalisco, Tequila, Guadalajara, and Cuquio, Mexico. It is available at health food stores. As a sweetener, Agave nectar, also known as Agave syrup, is notable in that it has a low glycemic index and low glycemic load. Apparently lower than most if not all other natural sweeteners on the market. It is thinner in texture and sweeter than honey.

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  • Oh, grilled salmon on cedar planks! Yes!

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  • At its foundation, cooking really only needs a few tools. They should be as good quality as you can afford and you should take care of them. This is especially true of your knives. Here're the basics of knifedom. Knives are for... At its foundation, cooking really only needs a few tools. They should be as good quality as you can afford and you should take care of them. This is especially true of your knives. Here're the basics of knifedom. Knives are for cutting. To cut they need to be sharp. When you use a knife it becomes dull. You need to sharpen your knives. Here's what happens. Through usage, a knife's edge actually wears away. To bring back the sharpness to the knife you must remove a small amount of material from the sides of the knife. That's what a sharpener does. There are many types of sharpeners, from sharpening stones (I've used them) to a manual sharpener like the Wusthof 2-Stage Sharpener (I've used them) to the electric sharpeners. I'm currently using the Chef's Choice 300W Diamond Hone Knife Sharpener pictured at the top. From the web site: The Chef's Choice sharpens in the two different stages: the sharpening stage and the second honing stage, which polishes the blade to a razor edge. Those two stages create different bevels, putting a "shoulder" on an edge instead of sharpening with a single bevel. The shoulder strengthens the edge so it lasts longer. And I think it does. The first time you use the sharpener you create those two bevels. After that, putting a new edge on takes just a minute or so. To make sure the angle is correct it has magnetic guides that hold the blade at the proper angle.

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  • If you thought making wine in your kitchen was exciting (see Is it Wine Yet?) how about becoming a real winemaker without the fuss of actually having a vineyard. There’s a company in California called Crushpad, located in the hear... If you thought making wine in your kitchen was exciting (see Is it Wine Yet?) how about becoming a real winemaker without the fuss of actually having a vineyard. There’s a company in California called Crushpad, located in the heart of San Francisco, where you can do just that. While making your own wine will be fun and exciting, at Crushpad it's also serious business. You won't be alone when you set out to create that perfect cult wine: Crushpad provides grapes from California's top vineyards, they have their own winemaking team, and a state-of-the-art winery. You choose your level of involvement and they “do the rest.” Their very robust web site is great at getting the juices flowing (sorry, couldn’t resist that one), whether you’re a new winemaker or an experienced one. More at

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  • Are you a better person just because you're a Foodie? Of course you are! Let the world know!

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  • This is the greatest. I always make my coffee in a french press at home and now I can make GREAT coffee anywhere, on the go! You just pour hot water over coffee grounds (or loose leaf tea), let steep, push stopper down and enjoy t... This is the greatest. I always make my coffee in a french press at home and now I can make GREAT coffee anywhere, on the go! You just pour hot water over coffee grounds (or loose leaf tea), let steep, push stopper down and enjoy the best brew around. No need to pour into a separate container, you can drink right from the pot.

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  • All of those crispy bits that remain on the bottom of your pans and pots after sautéing or browning are called the fond, from the French, to mean the base. And on that foundation great sauces are made. If you decide that, for ... All of those crispy bits that remain on the bottom of your pans and pots after sautéing or browning are called the fond, from the French, to mean the base. And on that foundation great sauces are made. If you decide that, for unknowable reasons, you don’t want a rich and tasty mushroom/shallot sauce with your beautifully pan-seared rib eye steak, a sauce you could make in the short time your steak rests before serving, if you decide you don’t want the sauce, well then, deglaze the pan anyway! The only thing better than that great old wooden spoon you've had for decades is a new wooden turner from OXO Good Grips.

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  • One of the key “moves” in that professional kitchen is “finishing” a dish in the oven. A pan is used to sauté or sear on the stove top and then its popped into the oven for finishing. This is my favorite pan to prepare a thick ... One of the key “moves” in that professional kitchen is “finishing” a dish in the oven. A pan is used to sauté or sear on the stove top and then its popped into the oven for finishing. This is my favorite pan to prepare a thick steak using this technique

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  • When it comes to taste, there are very few things that people agree upon. I think, however, that I’ve found one: brewing coffee in a French Press. Starbucks, in their Coffee Passport booklet given to new employees, calls the co... When it comes to taste, there are very few things that people agree upon. I think, however, that I’ve found one: brewing coffee in a French Press. Starbucks, in their Coffee Passport booklet given to new employees, calls the coffee press (French Press) “the best brewing method for enjoying a coffee’s true, full flavor.” It is quick, simple and, as illy caffee, the Italian coffee producer says, yields “a deeply satisfying coffee that is rich, robust and aromatic.” Making coffee in a French Press is simplicity itself: medium to coarsely ground coffee is placed in a cylinder, hot water is poured into the cylinder and a plunger separates the coffee from the grounds. Done.

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  • I make my coffee in a French Press and to heat the water for my coffee I use an electric kettle. I fill it the night before, and as soon as I wake up in the morning, I stumble into the kitchen and click it on. When I stumble back,... I make my coffee in a French Press and to heat the water for my coffee I use an electric kettle. I fill it the night before, and as soon as I wake up in the morning, I stumble into the kitchen and click it on. When I stumble back, the water is hot and the first thing I do is to pour hot water into the French Press to pre-heat it. Then I pour that water into my coffee cup to pre-heat that. Then I make my coffee. Of course it's great for any time you need boiling water like adding to soup stocks or even blanching vegetables.

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  • Keeps me warm and satisfied...

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  • Standing over the stove with pork slices spitting up at me, feeling guilty about pouring the bacon fat down the drain, and scraping all those bits off the pan and soaking it and washing it had me thinking about the soy alternative... Standing over the stove with pork slices spitting up at me, feeling guilty about pouring the bacon fat down the drain, and scraping all those bits off the pan and soaking it and washing it had me thinking about the soy alternative again. And then, that wacky pork lover himself, Alton Brown, showed me the light. Well, actually, he showed me the oven and the joys of bakin’ bacon.

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  • Hey, dogs can be foodies too!

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  • A great resource of whole foods and nutrition to help you enhance your natural beauty: includes recipes and self-help techniques for all parts of the body. Combines food plans and home relaxation and spa ideas.