I'm Not There ~ Todd Haynes

I'm Not There ~ Todd Haynes

Todd Haynes directs ruminations on the life of Bob Dylan, where seven characters embody a different aspect of the musician's life and work, and Cate Blanchett in drag!! What's not to like? :)

  • This was the quote that Woody Guthrie had on his guitar. Maybe that's why they're on these woody pencils? Maybe because writing can also destroy fascism? I dunno, but these are cool...

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  • This is what happens when Billy Bragg and Wilco team up to finish songs that Woody Guthrie had written, but never recorded. The result, nothing short of spectacular.

  • This is one of the last films Heath Ledger was in....he's amazing as is this movie...I recommend the movie, but it's not on DVD yet so here's the soundtrack :) Many people have covered Bob Dylan's songs over the years, but few ... This is one of the last films Heath Ledger was in....he's amazing as is this movie...I recommend the movie, but it's not on DVD yet so here's the soundtrack :) Many people have covered Bob Dylan's songs over the years, but few quite like this. On the double-disc soundtrack that accompanies Todd Haynes' extremely confounding biopic of the already plenty confounding folk icon, we get the likes of Sonic Youth, Cat Power, Yo La Tengo, the Hold Steady, and Antony & The Johnsons doing their best Dylan impressions and often failing gloriously. Former Pavement frontman Stephen Malkmus does a particularly fine job oozing his way through "Ballad of a Thin Man," while Wilco's Jeff Tweedy draws the moody beauty out of "Simple Twist of Fate," and Sufjan Stevens lends his typically baroque touch to "Ring Them Bells." Special credit has to go to the Million Dollar Bashers, the unofficial house band that includes Steve Shelley on drums, John Medeski on piano, and Tom Verlaine on guitar, along with other notable musicians. The generous track list and dynamic set of contributors promises that this album will provide plenty of awe long after the film itself has been forgotten. --Aidin Vaziri