Khalid Art Gallery

Khalid Art Gallery

In Marrakech, Morocco, the Khalid Art Gallery, where photos of celebrity shoppers—model Kate Moss, soccer star Zinedine Zidane, Hillary and Bill Clinton—attest to its reputation among the international elite. Owner Khalid el Gharib is the city’s leading purveyor of atmospheric furniture and accessories: eighteenth-century North African ceramics, Mogul-era marble fountains from India, antique embroidered silk portières, Syrian chairs and cabinets inlaid with snow-white bone (Naomi Campbell bought a lot for her bedroom). The stock of the two-story shop is more broadly orientalist than it is specifically Moroccan, an encyclopedic array of exotica from across the Arab world.

  • You won’t find museum-quality goods at Jackalope, which sprawls over six acres on Cerrillos Road, a commercial artery that extends from downtown Santa Fe to outlying neighborhoods; but it is a trip in both senses of the word. The v... You won’t find museum-quality goods at Jackalope, which sprawls over six acres on Cerrillos Road, a commercial artery that extends from downtown Santa Fe to outlying neighborhoods; but it is a trip in both senses of the word. The visitor is greeted by hundreds of huge, high-fired, high-color pots. Beyond is a building full of mostly inexpensive Latin American and Asian textiles, pottery, hardware, clothing, CDs, rugs, linens and tchotchkes. Head out the back door for antique and vintage garden accoutrements, open-air booth after booth of antiques, jewelry and crafts, and a building full of Asian furniture. As you should everywhere in this city, wear a hat to protect yourself from the sun, and take your time. If you shop at the pace at which Santa Fe runs, or rather, ambles, you may be lucky enough to stay there for the rest of your life.

  • On the second floor of the historic Catron Building in Santa Fe is the spacious and beautifully lit Price Dewey Galleries. When Victoria Price bought the Dewey Gallery in 2003 and rechristened it, she also expanded the original ga... On the second floor of the historic Catron Building in Santa Fe is the spacious and beautifully lit Price Dewey Galleries. When Victoria Price bought the Dewey Gallery in 2003 and rechristened it, she also expanded the original gallery’s emphasis on Native American textiles, pottery, jewelry and artifacts. Now on display as well are contemporary art and design like the totemic painted folk sculptures carved from fenceposts by the Navajo artist Charlie Willeto; tweaked traditional pottery (think purgatory depicted as a hot tub) by Marie Romero Cash; early New Mexican tin retablos; mid-century furniture from Scandinavia; and highly original found-metal pieces like the Carrier 3 bench by Tom Emerson.

  • At Distant Lands, Lorenzo Moog, the store manager, points out special items from the store’s vast collection of rare and unusual antiques from northern China, Tibet and Mongolia. Highlights include a Tibetan urn from Sezo; a 350-y... At Distant Lands, Lorenzo Moog, the store manager, points out special items from the store’s vast collection of rare and unusual antiques from northern China, Tibet and Mongolia. Highlights include a Tibetan urn from Sezo; a 350-year-old, ten-panel screen made of Chinese elm (in perfect condition); and a rare scholar’s stone from the Hebei Province: The Chinese call such stones, which are balanced on carved wooden stands, the "bones of the earth."

  • By Dorsey Sitley Adler and Robert D. Adler Stewart, Tabori & Chang, $29.95 This pleasingly chunky book is sized perfectly for flipping through, making the job of zeroing in on the right fabric for that chair or pair of drapes muc... By Dorsey Sitley Adler and Robert D. Adler Stewart, Tabori & Chang, $29.95 This pleasingly chunky book is sized perfectly for flipping through, making the job of zeroing in on the right fabric for that chair or pair of drapes much less burdensome than lugging around unruly sample books. In fact, you’d have to juggle quite a stack to see the range of fabrics pictured in this excellent resource, compiled by a husband-and-wife textile-expert team. The Adlers are the founders of the largest privately owned textile library in the country, and their archives are bursting with more than 4 million pattern swatches, ranging from nineteenth-century historical patterns to contemporary fabrics. Though the book offers a mere fraction of those archives, the 400 fabric swatches pictured are well edited and helpfully organized by pattern type, including stripes (ombre, ticking, variegated, twist yarn), geometrics (polka dots, deco, op-art, foulard), ethnics (tropical, paisley, batik, overprinted madras) and plaids (tattersall check, herringbone, houndstooth). What’s more, there’s just one full swatch pictured per page, making it easier to see. The text is spare—this is a look book on the order of a fan of paint chips—but what little accompanies each chapter may help the truly undecided; it describes the origins of and typical uses for each pattern.