Baraka

 Baraka - Photo 

Baraka is one of my all-time favorite movies ever. Shot in 70mm and filmed in 24 countries, it is a logistical and cinematic marvel. The film-makers pioneered several new technologies and techniques in order to capture various time-lapsed and motion-controlled sequences, such as the wheeling star...more


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6 Recommendations

  • gordon

    's recommendation

    Baraka is one of my all-time favorite movies ever. Shot in 70mm and filmed in 24 countries, it is a logistical and cinematic marvel. The film-makers pioneered several new technologies and techniques in order to capture various time-lapsed and motion-controlled sequences, such as the wheeling starscapes above various beautiful ancient ruins and natural wonders. But beyond the techniques, Baraka is a meditation upon humanity's place in nature and our relationship to ourselves. There is no dialogue in the entire movie and no plot in the conventional sense, but the movie is, nonethless, incredibly powerful and evocative. The movie is probably best described as a visual poem. Plus it has a really terrific soundtrack featuring Michael Stearns and some Dead Can Dance. While the DVD is great, I recently got to see Baraka again in 70mm (I have seen it 5x times). I had not seen it on a big screen in at least 10 years and it lost none of its original impact in the intervening decade. Also, Baraka's producer, Mark Magidson, was at the screening and he said he is making a sequel(!) and that a newly remastered version of the original DVD will soon be released. Lastly, Baraka is, perhaps somewhat counter-intuitively, turns out to be a great movie for kids (though there is one scene at the crematoriums in India which might be a bit graphic for them). My 2.5 and 4.5 year olds sat w/rapt attention throughout the entire film.

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  • frumpy

    's recommendation

    This actually came with our very first dvd player in 1999. It's a fantastic film with amazing cinematography. Chronos is great, but seeing people and animals instead of places takes this style to the next level.

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  • Samantran

    's recommendation

    Though Obama is the man, this has nothing to do with him. It does have to do with film making at its finest though. This was Ron Fricke's experimental film exposing the world's beautiful and hideous aspects. This is an experimental film but it's not an "experimental film" By that I mean it's not a plotless art film about angst or self-loathing. Everyone from the snobbiest art snob to the casual movie goer can appreciate this masterpiece. If you have ever seen and loved the Planet Earth series, then this is for you. This film set the groundwork for contemporary film making in the natural world.

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  • hcferris

    's recommendation

    Amazing, gorgeous. Highly recommended.

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  • kylaelise

    's recommendation

    Not known by many. No words. Just a beautiful global soundtrack by Phillip Glass and spectacular images from 24 countries. Many themes with the images that speak to life. I read someone saying it was alot of hype for a screensaver but I think it has so much more depth than that. Very much like the movies, "Koyaanisqatsi" and "Powaqqatsi".

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  • annekennedy

    's recommendation

    I was surprised to find that others commenting on this extraordinary work of art barely mention the genius whose handiwork it is. Ron Fricke is completely singular in the world of visual manipulation. His vision, perception, and technical know-how very literally affected the art form. Not many individuals, even those who are gifted and productive in every way, have that sort of impact. It has nothing to do with success - nothing to do with social promotion or popularity. I believe it's down to the rare combination of sensitivity, expression and hands-on obsession...what I think of as "ate up with it". Like a musician who cannot be separated from his or her instrument. Constant and intense dedication ...searching for that tone, living in the scales and technical ins and outs; often oblivious to their surroundings...missing meals, forgetting to change clothes; you know...ate up with it. So, we are fortunate to live in their time, to be able to experience the fruits of their labor. Anyway, Ron Fricke is a lovely cat and a truly great filmmaker (GREAT painter, as well, though I'm going back 40 years to say so.) I have no idea if he still paints. He built a submarine, too, if my memory serves me well, in the middle of Oklahoma in the Freaky Days, long ago. Every cinematographic piece he has produced (of which I am aware), has pried open a new part of my mind and influenced my ability to observe the world around me. You can't, in my opinion, say better than that.

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Collections Featuring This Item

  • Expand Your Mind

    gordon

    Curated by gordon

    STORM RIDERS GUIDE OF NORTH AMERICA A Soldier of the Great War by Mark Helprin The Magus by John Fowles Fooled by Randomness: The Hidden Role of Chance in Life and in the Markets by Nassim Nicholas Taleb Sector 7 by David Wiesner Accelerando by Charles Stross Let My People Go Surfing: The Education of a Reluctant Businessman by Yvon Chouinard The Rock Warrior's Way: Mental Training for Climbers by Arno Ilgner Treasure Hunt : Inside the Mind of the New Consumer by Michael J. Silverstein, John Butman
  • Confessions of a film junkie! Ordinary to Indie

    kylaelise

    Curated by kylaelise

    The Philadelphia Story American Beauty Double Indemnity (1944) Baraka Koyaanisqatsi / Powaqqatsi Amélie The Virgin Suicides (1999) In the Mood for Love - Wong Kar-wai -Criterion Collection The Royal Tenenbaums